we help adults teach art to kids

Posts by patty.palmer@deepspacesparkle.com

Same Project, Different Results: Art Made Easy 038

Same Project, Different Results: Art Made Easy 038

By on Jan 18, 2017 | 0 comments

Does this sound familiar? You teach a lesson and it goes terrific: the students understand the concepts and are totally engaged, but then you go to teach the same lesson at a different school, and it fails. The students don’t grasp the concepts and want to do their own thing. What do you do? This was the discussion last week inside the Members Club Facebook group. First time art teacher, Traci Ann wondered why this happens and how it can be avoided. If you’ve taught art for any length of time, you know this happens and that it happens to both seasoned and brand new teachers. This week’s episode addresses what to do when a proven project doesn’t work out so well and how you can pivot to ensure that your students get the most out of their time with you. IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL LEARN:  Why it is important to assess your classes’ strengths and abilities How to alter the lesson plan based on the outcome of the assessment How negative thoughts about the class room teacher’s management plan can affect your teaching abilities and/or outcome of your projects My advice when a lesson plan gets out of control (and how to regroup and start over) How to acknowledge problems or critique children’s work How to think on your feet when a project is not going well for a numerous amount of students Why it is important to be on the lookout for how students can help you refine the process of how you are teaching certain projects Whether or not templates should be used How to be mindful or the length of each project and the attention span of the children Subscribe to Art Made Easy and receive new episodes directly on your phone via your podcast Ap.  Note: If you have an iPhone, subscribe in iTunes. If you have an Android phone, subscribe in Stitcher.   YOUR TURN… What’s your strategy for dealing with projects that don’t go as planned? Share your tips, strategies an experience so we can reassure all of the new art teachers out there that this will happen and it is...

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The Organized Art Teacher: Art Made Easy 037

The Organized Art Teacher: Art Made Easy 037

By on Jan 11, 2017 | 1 comment

Do you feel overwhelmed when you look at your stacks of lesson plans and project ideas? Ever wondered how other art teachers store their lesson plans and samples? And what is the best way to store artwork? Start the year off with an organized mindset by hearing how Patty organized her hundreds of lesson plans and stacks of student art. IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL LEARN:  Why it’s never too late to organize, regardless of what point in the year it is How mindset plays a key role in successful organization Why listening to how other art teachers do things is a good idea Why identifying your organizational style is the first step to take How different themes can be organized and used later as reference tools What my criteria for throwing things out involves What you can do with teaching samples so that they can be used in the classroom How to effectively divide your lessons on the masters How (and why) organization is moving from binders to being done on computers Why the first day of art class is the perfect time to make a student portfolio, and how do you make one? Subscribe to Art Made Easy and receive new episodes directly on your phone via your podcast Ap.  Note: If you have an iPhone, subscribe in iTunes. If you have an Android phone, subscribe in Stitcher.   DOWNLOAD THE ORGANIZED ART TEACHER PDF SHOW NOTES:  Evernote Dropbox Pinterest...

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Incorporating STEAM Projects into your Art Room: Art Made Easy 036

Incorporating STEAM Projects into your Art Room: Art Made Easy 036

By on Jan 4, 2017 | 0 comments

Are you looking to incorporate a few STEAM art activities into your curriculum this year? Ana Dziengle from Babble, Dabble Do is this week’s guest on the podcast. If you haven’t met Ana before, I know you’ll love her. She’s the type of girl you want as a friend. And since she is originally from Santa Barbara, I’m claiming her as mine! Ana shares her favorite STEAM projects that engage kids and encourages them to think for themselves. And isn’t that what we all want? This episode is perfect for anyone wants to explore a few STEAM projects with their kids. Things you will learn in this episode: How Ana clearly seen the lifestyle she wanted and was able to make a hard decision to get it How Ana incorporates art and science together The many different aspects of being creative Why being artistic doesn’t mean it has to be through a traditional medium How to entice children with a magical component of art What STEAM projects are and why they should be incorporated in projects Why it is important to choose projects based on the age group of your kids How to step back and let the child’s project unfold without inserting what outcome you think the project could and should have How to prepare your children to not negatively compare their work Why doing projects alongside the children creates a great dynamic Subscribe to Art Made Easy and receive new episodes directly on your phone via your podcast Ap.  Note: If you have an iPhone, subscribe in iTunes. If you have an Android phone, subscribe in Stitcher. DOWNLOAD TWO STEAM BOOKLETS! Thanks Ana for providing two AMAZING activities…these are super cool, folks. To get yours, just click on the yellow box, add your name and email and the zip file containing the two PDF’s will be emailed to you. If you use safari on a MAC, the zip file won’t open. Try CHROME instead. SHOW NOTES: Ana’s book, Steam Kids Dyed Snow Flake Project from Babble Dabble Do 20 Science projects for Kids from Babble Dabble Do Don’t Move the Muffin Tins: A Hands-Off Guide to Art for the Young Child by Bev Bos...

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Join me for a Free Training!

Join me for a Free Training!

By on Dec 31, 2016 | 6 comments

Imagine this… Open House, May 2016. A year’s worth of teaching, planning, and creating paid off. My room looked exactly how I wanted it to, and it was decorated from floor to ceiling with DSS art projects. Parents were literally in awe of what their 8 year-old children had created. The kids were beaming with pride, the parents were teary with gratitude, and I felt like a rock star! Amazing, right? We all want to feel this! This was posted in Facebook from from Michelle, a member in Deep Space Sparkle’s The Members’ Club. She went from not knowing a thing about art to creating art on a regular basis with her 2nd grade students. I couldn’t be happier for her and I want it for you, too. Start the new year with art projects that are guaranteed to engaged and inspire students. It’s a bold statement but I know that if you apply even three out of the five steps, you’ll experience an uptick in student behavior, less frustrated artists and projects that surprise kids with their artistic ability. RESERVE YOUR SEAT Here are the details: The 60-minute TRAINING focuses on: 5 Steps on how to identify the best projects for each grade level (K-6) What art supplies work best with each age group What skills are essential to learn in each grade plus much more. There’s a lot to cover, so I created a TRAINING WORKBOOK for you to download and fill out as we move through the training. You’ll receive an email with a link to download the workbook after you register.   A FEW MORE BONUSES… https://d3ndagut9sanks.cloudfront.net/Launch-D/TMC+L3+Webinar+LP.mp4 I’m a visual learner so I think it’s important to have something to download and keep. I created TWO art resources that will help you plan your art program. The first is a curriculum guide and skills checklist. It’s a super handy list of skills that you can expect children to be proficient at in each grade level. This helps when you are looking at a lesson and are trying to determine whether it will work for your group of kids. The second is a list of art supplies, where to buy them and most importantly, how to use them. I don’t make any...

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Top Podcast Episodes of 2016

Top Podcast Episodes of 2016

By on Dec 26, 2016 | 2 comments

It’s been a wonderful experience creating the Art Made Easy podcast for you. I’ve been a huge fan of podcasts for years and while I have always hated the sound of my voice, I wanted to have conversations with folks in the creative space. Podcasting seemed like the best way to do that and have you join the fun, too. It started a bit rough. I spent weeks learning how to record and edit the episodes and many frustrating days converting the MP3 files. It wasn’t until my friend Rick Mulready suggested I hire a podcast editor that the podcast became manageable. Best advice 0f 2016, I swear. I interviewed so many amazing people. And because of you, Art Made Easy was on the What’s Hot list in iTunes from the very first week of launching and stayed on the What’s Hot list in K-12 Education ever since. Of all the folks I interviewed, a few really stood out. These are the episodes that I learned the most from or who inspired me the most.  It just so happens that you felt the same way because these were some of the most downloaded episodes: 1. Episode 015: Drawing with Kids & How to Make Awesome Videos with Rob Jensen. Within minutes of talking to Rob, I knew why he has amassed over a half a million YouTube subscribers and why he resonates with so many: he’s just so darn nice. And super creative. He lives in a space of abundance and shares his love of drawing to thousands of followers each week. Of course, I wanted to know how he creates his videos so I asked a lot of questions. If you are interested in creating some art videos and how to promote on social media, Rob tells you how it’s done. 2. Episode 012: Simple Classroom Management Techniques with Michael Linsin: There is no an art teacher on earth who has perfected the art of classroom management but using Michael’s techniques, we can come pretty darn close. Really. His advice is so logical that we come away feeling confident that we can tackle even the most problematic situations. If you want to start the year off on the right foot, have a listen to a few strategies that are guaranteed to help you in...

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2017 ART CALENDAR

2017 ART CALENDAR

By on Dec 24, 2016 | 1 comment

Happy New Year to you all! My favorite part of the entire year is the sweet spot between Christmas and New Year. It’s my time to reflect and plan. I LOVE planning and although my great intentions don’t always pan out, they serve as a guide for me to follow. I created this Art Calendar years ago because I needed a quick glance at the special events, artist’s birthdays and special projects that I wanted to consider when creating my art curriculum. I had a lot of flexibility in the type of lessons I taught but keeping in sync with the school calendar was important. THE 2017 ART CALENDAR INCLUDES: US and Canadian Holidays Artist Birthdays Lesson Suggestions (with links to free posts) Art Project Idea Page Monthly Project Idea Chart HOW TO USE THE CALENDAR When I was teaching, I liked to photocopy the art calendar onto card stock and place in my Planner Binder. Every month, I would look forward to the next month to see what celebrations or artist birthdays I could incorporate. I didn’t try to celebrate every artist’s birthday or even do an art project for every celebration, but the calendar allowed me to see if it was possible. Because I worked in rotations, not every class or grade level would have the opportunity to celebrate special holidays. So if my second and third graders created holiday projects in December but my Fourth and Fifth graders weren’t scheduled until January, I made sure to plan Valentine’s Day projects for them. This was just a peculiarity of my schedule but the calendar really helped me see what was coming. WOULD YOU LIKE A COPY? Click the image below to access your FREE 2017 Art Calendar. I really hope that it is useful to you. If it is, I’d love to hear how you are using the calendar. You can share your photo’s in the Deep Space Sparkle Facebook Page. Join HERE. Enjoy your calendar and have an awesome + bright 2017!...

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Watercolor Paints & Paper: What Works Best

Watercolor Paints & Paper: What Works Best

By on Dec 11, 2016 | 3 comments

Here’s a question I get asked a lot: Can I use regular paper with my watercolor paints? Or do I need to use watercolor paper? The answer is yes! I like using liquid watercolor paints (affiliate link) on regular sulphite drawing paper but it only works well for a specific result. Here’s a video to explain what the differences are: https://d11vly3u9uru85.cloudfront.net/2016-D/watercolor+paper+and+paints.mp4 Summary Sulphite paper is about 76 lbs and will soak up the watercolor paint quickly. This doesn’t make it an effective surface to promote color blending or using the salting technique. Watercolor is best for blending watercolors and adding salt for that lovely starburst effect because it has texture. This allows the watercolor paint to sit on the paper surface for a longer period of time to allow for the mingling. The biggest difference is using glitter watercolor paints on sulphite paper. The viscosity in the glitter watercolor seems to help the liquid stay on the paper’s surface long enough for an effective salting technique. Here are some projects that use liquid watercolor paints on regular sulphite paper: 1. Watercolor Castle for Kinders-Second Grade 2. Watercolor Sunflowers 3. Underwater Hippos for second and third grade Interested in experimenting with more watercolor techniques? DOWNLOAD THE WATERCOLOR TECHNIQUE CHEAT SHEET Just click on the image below, add your name and email and you will be sent the PDF via your email address (make sure to check you spam/junk mail folder). Note: You will also be directed to a Thank you page where you can see other freebies that may interest...

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Gustav Klimt: Master of Metallics

Gustav Klimt: Master of Metallics

By on Dec 5, 2016 | 4 comments

Introducing Gustav Klimt to your students is really like opening up a pot of gold. There are so many interesting facets to his art and his life. One of the most impactful pieces to his story is how many of his works were destroyed by the Germans during WWII. Medicine, painted in 1900-1907 was destroyed along with a few others. I recently picked up a book that features beautiful Klimt-inspired illustrations. If you are doing a lesson on Klimt and in particular, his Tree of Life, I encourage you to find a copy of this book. Perfect for grade 3 and...

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Mola-Inspired Holiday Stockings

Mola-Inspired Holiday Stockings

By on Dec 4, 2016 | 0 comments

Part culture, part color theory and all fun, this Mola-inspired Holiday Stocking will keep the kids busy drawing, cutting and composing their own colorful stockings. ABOUT MOLAS Molas are cloth panels that form part of a blouse for the Kuna women of Panama. They use a quilting technique called reverse appliqué to create the designs in the fabric. Because I used to be (and hope to be again!) a quilter, I know all about reverse appliqué. It’s pretty fun to do but darn hard to explain to kids. After a few attempts I decided that it’s just best to say that a Mola is a fabric panel with colorful strips sewn in. USING MOLAS IN THE ART ROOM Art teachers all over the world incorporate Mola art into their curriculum to help children connect with the process and purpose of creating art. Sometime art becomes abstract for kids if all we do is teach our students that art is about history and famous artists. Art can be found all around us: where we live, our clothing and everyday objects. One way to do this is by understanding THE STEPS to making a Mola-Inspired project: Draw Mola image with basic shapes and rainbow or echo lines. Molas are made up of basic, recognizable shapes: turtle, sun, flower, fish, etc. Notice that the Mola has a basic center shape and then lines are drawn around this shape to create the recognizable image. In the Mola above, the turtle starts out as an OVAl. Lines are drawn around the oval to create the head and four legs. Repeat the drawing of lines until you have the shape desired. Add vertical or horizontal strips of paper to achieve the decorative background. This can also be achieved using construction paper crayons or oil pastels. DOWNLOAD A FREE MOLA STOCKING PROJECT   ARE YOU A MEMBER? The Mola-Inspired Stocking full project tutorial plus hundreds of lesson plans, art resources and videos is included with your monthly membership. Enrollment opens January...

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Beyond Lesson Plans – Modern Ways to Connect & Collaborate in Your Art Room – Art Made Easy 035

Beyond Lesson Plans – Modern Ways to Connect & Collaborate in Your Art Room – Art Made Easy 035

By on Nov 30, 2016 | 0 comments

Are you looking for ways to spruce up your art program? Move beyond traditional lesson plans with artist trading cards, a flipped classroom and QR codes. Nic Hahn, author of the popular blog, Mini Matisse, shares how she transitioned to a choice-based art room, how she uses videos to flip her classroom plus she shares the art projects that have been the most successful with her students.   IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL LEARN: How working with different age groups gives you added perspective as a blogger How Artist Trading Cards help the learning process for students How her focus on Careers in Art has exposed the children to all sorts of possibilities Why reflection in the art room is needed, and how Nic ties pop culture into the curriculum Why she uses QR codes in her classroom How questions she receives online leads the direction of her blog How presenting the masters of art to her classes allowed Nic to grow as an artist herself   Subscribe to Art Made Easy and receive new episodes directly on your phone via your podcast App.  Note: If you have an iPhone, subscribe in iTunes. If you have an Android phone, subscribe in Stitcher. SHOW NOTES: Yuko Larson and Nic Hahn’s Trading Cards Bit-O-Bios Art Biography QR Codes Lesson Download Careers in Art Sample Lesson Download Careers in Art See Saw...

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How to Handle the Holiday Crush – Art Made Easy 034

How to Handle the Holiday Crush – Art Made Easy 034

By on Nov 23, 2016 | 0 comments

The holidays don’t need to be a time for stressful schedules and hectic classes. Make this season your best ever by determining what your holiday intentions are, how to navigate your school’s holiday celebration parameters and what projects to do with your students that will deliver smiles for all. In this episode, Patty addresses the big issues art teachers face every December: What should you do when your school doesn’t celebrate the Holidays? How to handle children who can’t participate in anything remotely seasonal. How to set your intentions so you can enjoy the season and bring focus to what brings you happiness. A list of non-religious art projects you can do in a short amount of time. How Parkinson’s Law applies to teaching art Subscribe to Art Made Easy and receive new episodes directly on your phone via your podcast App.  Note: If you have an iPhone, subscribe in iTunes. If you have an Android phone, subscribe in Stitcher. 5 NON-RELIGIOUS ART PROJECTS FOR THE HOLIDAYS Click the yellow button below and add your name and email to the form to download your project plan. NOTE: The PDF will be sent to your email. Make sure to enter a correct email address and check your junk mail. SHOW NOTES: Teachers Pay Teachers : Deep Space Sparkle will be participating in the Cyber Monday and Tuesday sale on November 28 and 29....

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Paper Plate Poinsettia: Holiday Craft for Kids

Paper Plate Poinsettia: Holiday Craft for Kids

By on Nov 22, 2016 | 10 comments

While decidedly Christmas in flavor, this easy holiday craft for kids can vary in paint colors to compliment any season. I’ll admit that creating these pink beauties filled my creativity bucket for the day. So grab some paint, a few paper plates from your pantry and crank up the holiday tunes. I guarantee, you’ll enjoy this as much as your kids! This project is perfect for those days during the holiday season when you need a fun activity for your festival of lights unit or holiday unit. Picture Book Recommendation The Legend of the Poinsettia by Tomie DePaola This book is set in a small village in Mexico and is a retelling of a traditional folk tale. It does have strong religious content so it may not be appropriate for your class. Each teacher can determine whether it is suitable for his or her classroom. Here’s what you’ll need: 10”, 9” & 6” Plate (exact size is not as important as 3 different sizes) Red, white, green and yellow liquid tempera paint Gold metallic paint (optional) Small kitchen sponges (cut a regular sponge into smaller rectangles) Red, white and green oil pastels Paint brushes Yellow tissue paper Scissors Pencil Small plastic cup or lid White School Glue Don’t be alarmed by the extensive supply list. Most everything can be found in your art pantry. I find tempera paints are best but if you have craft acrylic paints (the kind you find in craft stores) then you are great. Curious what the difference is between tempera paint and acrylic paint? Here’s a video showing what I discovered: Acrylic vs Tempera Paint. * DOWNLOAD THE FREE PDF BELOW FOR INSTRUCTIONS, PHOTOGRAPHS AND ARTIST STATEMENT How to Make the Poinsettia: Each student receives 3 paper plates. I use the most inexpensive brand that has no printing on it. It doesn’t matter the size of the plates, but it does help to have 3 different sizes: small, medium and large. Place a small condiment cup or circle template in the middle of the LARGEST PLATE. Draw a circle. Starting at the outside edge of the plate, cut a leaf shape towards the center circle. Do not cut through the circle. For younger kids, it may be helpful to...

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Top Tips for being an Awesome Art Room Volunteer- Art Made Easy 033

Top Tips for being an Awesome Art Room Volunteer- Art Made Easy 033

By on Nov 9, 2016 | 0 comments

In today’s episode, I answer a question from Ashley, a member of Deep Space Sparkle’s Members’ Club. Ashley asks, How do you train volunteers so they become an art room asset instead of a liability? This is such a great question. I’ve been a volunteer in my children’s classes and had the opportunity to work with some of the best parents in the world.  And let me just say, there’s a learning curve to both sides. In this episode I help you clarify the message and task list you send to your volunteers and help parents maximize their time spent as a volunteer.   If you are an art teacher, this is what you’ll learn: How taking a few minutes to write down what you need help with can save time for both you and the parent Why you need to communicate clearly and professionally what needs to be done (just because they are volunteers doesn’t mean their time is unlimited)! How delegating the right task to the right volunteer will result in a more efficient classroom How having a parent with photography skills can benefit you How any negativity and distractions can disrupt the learning experience Why it’s important to accept the outcome and realize that the job might not be done to the same level that you could do it If you are a volunteer, this is what you’ll learn: Why it’s helpful to tell the teacher your parameters beforehand How listening to the teacher’s demonstration and being prepared to help will make you a more effective volunteer Why you need to help every child in the classroom, and not just your own When volunteering, why hiring a babysitter is a good plan How being a worker and finishing the task at hand will allow you to be of the most benefit to the class Subscribe to Art Made Easy and receive new episodes directly on your phone via your podcast App.  Note: If you have an iPhone, subscribe in iTunes. If you have an Android phone, subscribe in Stitcher. SHOW NOTES: Artsonia...

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The Top Watercolor Techniques for Kids

The Top Watercolor Techniques for Kids

By on Nov 3, 2016 | 7 comments

Are you a new art teacher wanting to try a watercolor project with your students? Perhaps you’re an artist who is  teaching art to kids for the first time. Determining the best watercolor techniques for young children can be challenging. For children in Kindergarten through fifth grade, I have always found that its best to keep it simple. Here are my top 4 watercolor techniques that I use with children in grades K-6: Wet-on-Wet Wet-on-Dry Wax Resist Black Marker Last summer, I hosted a workshop for 200 teachers. I demonstrated a simple experiment that is great to try at the beginning of a watercolor unit. You can present it as a practice session before the real project but in fact, the resulting art can be quite beautiful. I did a version of this experiment with a group of 6th graders (age 11-12) a few years back as a practice for a detailed watercolor project. The experiment helped children identify the properties of watercolor paints and explore all the possibilities of what the medium can do. You can read all about my 6th grade watercolor experiment here. WHAT TO DO: I created a Cheat Sheet for you to download as a guide to help walk you through drawing the grid, the 4 techniques and what to say to the kids. I also included a few simple drawing prompts in case some kids get stuck on what to draw. We don’t want the drawing holding them up as the point of the lesson is to experiment. The first thing to do is to draw a grid. I demonstrated 4 techniques to my room full of teachers, but you can add or subtract techniques depending on the age of the children or just the complexity of the experiment. Note: The PDF demonstrates what to do. Work your way through each of the four techniques. I like to demonstrate ONE technique at a time and allow the children to work for 5-10 minutes on the technique before moving on. In elementary school, we are always looking for process-based art projects that lead to the development of skills and creativity. Understanding what mediums can do in order to fully express a child’s creativity is a part of this process. I encourage...

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The SPARKLE Method for Lesson Development – Art Made Easy 032

The SPARKLE Method for Lesson Development – Art Made Easy 032

By on Nov 2, 2016 | 0 comments

Developing art lessons can be overwhelming to create with a busy schedule. Sure you can use the same art lessons every year but every now and again, you’ll want (or be required) to create lessons for a very specific topic or subject. Over the years, I created a criteria for assessing whether or not a lesson will work in my art program. I call it my SPARKLE method for lesson development. These 7 key steps will help you create art projects that are unique to you, your art program and that your students will love. IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL LEARN: Why it’s important to flex your creative muscles and see what you can create on your own How I get ideas for my new projects, both around the house and while travelling Why illustrations have to be understandable for children in order to convert successfully into an art lesson What to do if you have a set curriculum to follow The secret to know if a project will work for students Why you don’t need to apologize for your weaknesses – play up your strengths! How it’s important to try out a new lesson yourself before introducing it to your class Why if you’re introducing an art concept in a school environment, there has to be a reason for it How telling a story or interesting fact about an artist will engage children and make the lesson memorable When you’re doing research you can use sensory details to explain or elaborate on an artist’s technique How YouTube videos can easily be used to teach kids about artists that you’re not overly familiar with When designing a lesson around a master, make sure the person has a broad appeal for the age group you’re teaching to How using lingo, or vocabulary, in your art room is a great way to make sure your lesson planning is on track The mindset shift I had to make when it came to using 3-D forms Subscribe to Art Made Easy and receive new episodes directly on your phone via your podcast Ap.  Note: If you have an iPhone, subscribe in iTunes. If you have an Android phone, subscribe in Stitcher. SHOW NOTES: Eric Carle Lois Ehlert...

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How to Manage Overwhelm: Art Made Easy 031

How to Manage Overwhelm: Art Made Easy 031

By on Oct 26, 2016 | 9 comments

Are you feeling overwhelmed? I must admit that this year has been an intentionally busy one for me. In order to prevent overwhelm, I fall back on 5 strategies that keep me focused on what is important, what I value and the most important tasks I need to accomplished in a day. This episode will help you identify when you are about to go down that overwhelm hole and how to get yourself back on track. After you listen to the episode, let me know how you handle overwhelm. Share in the comments below… IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL LEARN: How change can never happen without some level of being uncomfortable How the recent expansion of Deep Space Sparkle is exciting, but overwhelming at the same time The three main factors that contribute to overwhelm When you give yourself permission to alter things with your own twists, the expectation placed on you go way down How saying “Yes” too many times can lead to you feeling depleted How information overload can lead you down the rabbit hole of overwhelm, and how choosing what to focus on can help Why that “little voice” in our head doesn’t serve us How the mind is a powerful tool that can be used to your advantage when facing overwhelm Why going for a walk in nature often solves everything, particularly for someone who is introverted Subscribe to Art Made Easy and receive new episodes directly on your phone via your podcast Ap.  Note: If you have an iPhone, subscribe in iTunes. If you have an Android phone, subscribe in Stitcher. SHOW NOTES: AME 016: 5 Mindset Shifts That Made a Difference in my Life AME 026: Unlocking Your Potential with Personality Tests A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life’s Purpose (Oprah’s Book Club, Selection 61) A New Earth with Oprah and Eckhart 10-part...

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Rat Silhouette Template & Craft

Rat Silhouette Template & Craft

By on Oct 23, 2016 | 4 comments

I know. This doesn’t look like Patty. Truth is, it’s my favorite Halloween decoration. I discovered the craft in a Martha Stewart Magazine when my kids were young. I cut out Martha’s templates, arranged the colony of rats around doorways, staircases and floorboards and forgot about them. But lordy. When you open your front door and forget you were in a crafting mood the day before…yikes. These rats are deceptively life like! RAT CRAFT FOR KIDS It’s an easy project to do with kids but you need to tailor it just a bit. Here’s what I would suggest for older kids (8+): Photocopy the templates from the PDF resource below. Photocopy the black template directly onto white cardstock Carefully cut rats from cardstock. Arrange around room For younger kids (5-8 years), you’ll need to make the rats a bit bigger. Here’s what to do: Cut the grey scale template into 3 pieces with one rat per section. Photocopy the individual grey scale rats onto white paper. Make sure to enlarge at least 25%. The larger shape makes it easier for small hands to cut out. Place rat sheet onto black construction paper and tape the edges. This will result in a solid black rat. Kids can cut around the rat shape. Don’t worry about the whiskers or hairs. Too detailed for this age-group. Enjoy! GET THE TEMPLATE HERE: Click the BLUE box, enter your first name and email, check your email (including junk mail) and download...

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Crafting with Red Ted Art: Art Made Easy 030

Crafting with Red Ted Art: Art Made Easy 030

By on Oct 19, 2016 | 0 comments

Do you love creating crafts with your kids? Or creating art based on famous artists? Learn how engineer turned crafter, Maggy Woodley started Red Ted Art, an arts & craft blog for kids. The success of her blog lead to her first book deal, Cute & Easy Crafts for Kids and grew her Facebook page to 1.8 million fans and almost 91K subscribers on You Tube. Amazing, right? Maggy was so much fun to talk to. She shares so many secrets of how she grew her blog following while raising a family. Even if you aren’t a blogger, I know you’ll find so many gems in this conversation. Enjoy the show! IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL LEARN:  How getting content out there can help you define your niche How Maggy defines art vs. crafts What types of recycled materials around the house can be used (instead of expensive supplies) Maggy’s favorite craft products from Red Ted Art How she uses Facebook and YouTube to build a following with both adults and children Advice from Maggy on starting a blog and the challenges that come with it Why building a network or meeting blogging friends can help you succeed The benefits of blogging courses and why waiting six months proves your chances to succeed. What resource Maggy calls “Invaluable” Subscribe to Art Made Easy and receive new episodes directly on your phone via your podcast Ap.  Note: If you have an iPhone, subscribe in iTunes. If you have an Android phone, subscribe in Stitcher. SHOW NOTES: Red Ted Art blog Red Ted Art Cute & Easy Crafts for Kids YouTube Facebook Barbara Richardson Andy Goldsworthy Lesson on DSS Check out Maggy’s favorite crafts – Walnut Babies and Halloween Lanterns...

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Perfect Timing: Solutions for Early Finishers – Art Made Easy 029

Perfect Timing: Solutions for Early Finishers – Art Made Easy 029

By on Oct 12, 2016 | 6 comments

Do you get frustrated when your students rush to finish a project to work on free drawing or a coloring sheet? Do you find you are constantly being challenge to find solutions for early finishers? In this episode of Art Made Easy, I walk you through strategies to help your students finish an art project during the scheduled time plus tips to help you assess your lesson timelines, free choice activities and grade-level projects. IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL LEARN:  Why you really need to step back and look at the reasons why timing is problematic in the first place What to expect when kids begin art projects How providing predictability in what your children can expect in the art room can go a long way in gauging how long it will take them to do a certain task How demonstrations can be used before, and during a lesson, to grow the listening and attention skills of your students Why your reaction matters The benefits of sticking to a lesson that was tested for that grade level Why setting up as many limitations as possible for the “perfectionist” student is the best thing you can do How to use free choice time effectively Why portfolios can be a good alternative to free choice The benefits of directed line drawings and how they can be used to help get a handle on how long children are able to work on a project Patty’s strategies and script for teaching a direct drawing Subscribe to Art Made Easy and receive new episodes directly on your phone via your podcast Ap.  Note: If you have an iPhone, subscribe in iTunes. If you have an Android phone, subscribe in Stitcher. SHOW NOTES Draw & Paint a ¾ View Snowman Art Project How to Draw a Snowman without using Circles Art Project AME 025: All About Guided Drawings All About Free-Choice Art...

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Life After Teaching Part II – Art Made Easy 028

Life After Teaching Part II – Art Made Easy 028

By on Oct 6, 2016 | 3 comments

Have you ever wondered whether you could run your own creative business? In this episode, I’ll walk you through what its like owning a business, qualities you need to possess to be an entrepreneur and what to look for when deciding what type of business you would like to run. This episode is perfect for anyone who is looking to supplement a teaching income, explore ways to teach art outside of school and general tips for starting your own creative business. IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL LEARN: What my definition of entrepreneurship is and the various ups and downs of being an entrepreneur Why it’s important to let your business develop organically How with being an entrepreneur, all the freedom/responsibility is on you What qualities are key for being an entrepreneur How to solve problems and conflicts without getting personal How to grow your business by systemizing How to determine what people want then take the lesson a little bit further to give them what they need What is the “hand maker” movement and why is it gaining popularity? How to set up your environment and get the rules and regulations from your Chamber of Commerce Why videos can enhance your online business and blogs and podcasts can help you excel How to charge for your services What is test marketing and competitive shopping Subscribe to Art Made Easy and receive new episodes directly on your phone via your podcast Ap.  Note: If you have an iPhone, subscribe in iTunes. If you have an Android phone, subscribe in Stitcher.   SHOW NOTES:  Art Made Easy 027: Life After Teaching – Part I James Wedmore Art Projects For Kids Art Made Easy 010: Tips For Running An After-School Art Program with Kathy Barbro WHATEVER… blog, Meg Duerksen While She Naps, Abby Glassenberg CraftSanity Blog and Podcast, Jennifer Ackerman-Haywood...

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Contour Cat Watercolor Project

Contour Cat Watercolor Project

By on Oct 5, 2016 | 3 comments

The complementary colors of orange and blue are everywhere this fall season. And why not showcase these happy colors with a blue belly cat? A bit of doodling the other day prompted a quick contour drawing of this cute cat. Using the simple drawing handout,  children can free-draw their own contour cat to use as the subject of three watercolor techniques: Wet-on-wet watercolor (cat) Wet-on-dry watercolor (background) Wax resist (white outline and watercolor barrier) This lesson can be done in two steps. First, draw the contour cat with a sharpie on watercolor paper. Then paint the cat and background. Second, after the paint dries, add the pattern and lines. ART SUPPLIES waterproof black marker watercolor paper (90 lb) pan watercolor paints white crayon or oil pastel medium round brush water TECHNIQUES wet-on-wet wet-on-dry wax resist contour line drawing patterns, shape and line DRAWING DIRECTIONS Use the drawing handout as a guide to draw a contour line of a simple cat. Focus on drawing two ears, a head, a long neck, hunched shoulders, simple paws and a long, curvy tail. Don’t worry if it doesn’t look perfect. The fun part is drawing wonky lines! Draw two oval shapes for the EYES. With a white crayon, trace carefully along the outside of the black marker line. With a brush, touch the blue paint and dip into water so the clear water has a tint of blue. Brush water inside the contour line. With BLUE paint, start painting a LINE of color along the bottom of the cat. Hold paper upside down so that the blue drips and mingles towards the body. Continue painting the cat blue, allowing the paint to migrate down the paper using gravity. This is really fun for kids as they can see how the colored paint will travel to the wet areas. Paint outside of the contour line (NEGATIVE SPACE) blue’s COMPLEMENTARY COLOR (orange!) After paint dries, use the black marker to add a NOSE and a MOUTH. Fill the cat with patterns, lines and...

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How to Make a Papel Picado

How to Make a Papel Picado

By on Sep 30, 2016 | 3 comments

TRADITIONAL MEXICAN PAPEL PICADO Papel Picado is a traditional Mexican craft that features colorful paper sheets with intricate cut out details.  It was made by stacking many sheets of paper and using chisels to cut the designs. You can easily make your own Papel Picado by layering sheets of tissue paper and using scissors to cut the designs. EARLY FINISHER OR SUB PLAN PROJECT This is a great free choice activity or a lesson for a sub. Laminate the instructions and place on a table. Add a tray of pre-cut tissue papers, a bowl of scissors and allow the children to create a papel picado during free-choice time. WHAT YOU’LL NEED: Colored tissue paper (12 x 9 approximately) Scissors Marker Yarn and Tape to display Papel Picados INSTRUCTIONS: Fold a piece of tissue paper (lengthwise) in half and then in half again. Make sure one side consist only of folds. Fold the long folded sheet in half. Mark a dot in the corner that is made up of folds. This helps the children recognize where not to cut. Just like cutting a snowflake, cut shapes along all four sides avoiding the area with the dot. To cut a shape from the middle of the rectangle, fold the paper in half again, and cut a shape into the fold. Unfold carefully and tape tissue paper to a long string of yarn. To make multiple panels from one cut, layer 2-3 sheets of tissue paper together ad tape (carefully) while cutting. INSTRUCTIONAL DOWNLOAD Would you like a copy of the instructions?  Click the red box below, fill out your name and email (careful with spelling!) and we’ll send you a free instruction PDF...

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Life After Teaching – Art Made Easy 027

Life After Teaching – Art Made Easy 027

By on Sep 29, 2016 | 12 comments

Are you dreaming of what life will look like after you retire from teaching art? Or perhaps you’ve had enough of teaching and are ready to move on? Today’s episode helps a reader bridge the gap between finding happiness as a K-8 public elementary art teacher and her dreams of opening up a children’s art studio. This is Part I of a two-part series on exploring creative opportunities after teaching. IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL LEARN: What are three main courses of action you can take when you feel like you’re ready to switch things up How it was a natural progression for me to move from teaching art to starting a blog What the word “inspire” means to me Why you shouldn’t underestimate the power of creating something everyday that’s just for you How its possible (and so important) to merge your hobbies and interests with teaching and how it can benefit both you and your students in the art room Why learning a new skill just might awaken the future entrepreneur inside of you How lessons learned from TV shows can help you connect with your students Why earning money from selling teaching resources can boost not only your pocketbook but your enthusiasm for the work you do How presenting at events and teaching workshops can be exciting opportunities to grow and help you prepare for your future Why you need to make the decisions on the curriculum (not children or parents) if you are teaching out of your home studio LISTEN TO THE SHOW Subscribe to Art Made Easy and receive new episodes directly on your phone via your podcast Ap. Note: If you have an iPhone, subscribe in iTunes. If you have an Android phone, subscribe in Stitcher. SHOW NOTES:  Cassie Stephens’ Blog Creativebug Teachers Pay Teachers Art Made Easy 021, with Ginger Bowerman Pacer Laura Lohmann’s Website National Arts Education Association Art Made Easy 002, with Heidi Easley Art Made Easy 009, with Megan...

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Unlocking Your Potential with Personality Tests – Art Made Easy 026

Unlocking Your Potential with Personality Tests – Art Made Easy 026

By on Sep 21, 2016 | 6 comments

In this episode of Art Made Easy I’m diving down the rabbit hole of personality tests. Don’t know if you are a fan, but I’ve been literally obsessed with the Myers-Briggs test since I listen to The Mind Your Business podcast a few months ago. Here’s what I learned; by knowing what makes you tick, you can learn how to become a better teacher, engage in activities that bring you more joy and be around people who compliment you. You may not be overly familiar with personality test, but trust me, knowing the reasons why you do what you do really helps with making decisions—big and small. This episode is for anyone who is interested in being happier at work, choosing activities that energize you and learning how to manage your personal relationships.  It’s also a lot of fun figuring out who you really are! IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL LEARN:  –  How knowing what makes you “tick” can actually make you a better teacher –  How just being good at something doesn’t mean you should build a career from it –  That my strength was a single verb, “Create”, which has guided everything I do from my blog to my lessons –  What the four categories of the Myers-Briggs Personality Test are –  Where we get our energy from is the key to determining if we are an introvert or extrovert –  How you have to throw out your preconceived ideas of what people are based on their occupation –  How people with opposite personality traits can make a relationship work –  Why understanding other peoples’ personality types can make it easier to work with them   LISTEN TO THE SHOW   SHOW NOTES:  The Mind Your Business Podcast, with James Wedmore and Phoebe Mroczek (if you are a creative entrepreneur and haven’t listened to this podcast, you need to check it out. You’ll love it. I promise.) Episode 020: Know Thyself, Know Thy Business Episode 021: Know Thyself (Part 2) Marcus Buckingham on Oprah Now, Discover Your Strengths by Marcus Buckingham Take a Myers-Briggs Test and Read About your Type Did you enjoy this show? Get automatic updates by subscribing to Art Made Easy on...

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