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Posts by Patty

Meet Marisa!

Meet Marisa!

By on May 13, 2016 | 2 comments

I’m so excited for you to meet Marisa Gebert, the newest member of the growing Deep Space Sparkle team. I reached out to my readers to find the perfect person to help me incorporate Common Core Standards as well as the National Core Art Standards into my lesson plans. We had close to 500 applicants. It was wonderful reading the emails and how Deep Space Sparkle has impacted your art curriculum. There were far more qualified people than I expected but I reviewed each one carefully. Many were asked to submit sample lesson plans and they were all amazing. Thank you to everyone who took the time to do so. I connected with Marisa right off the bat.  I was thrilled she was able to devote some of her time to helping me ready my lesson plans for my new Members Club that will be launching in August. Here’s a note from Marisa…. My name is Marisa Gebert, and I am so excited to be part of the DSS team! I live in Georgia with my husband, Andy and our sweet German Shepherd, Harley. We are expecting our newest addition next month… our first baby! We could not be more thrilled. I am a K-8 Art Teacher at St. Catherine of Siena Catholic School in Kennesaw, and Andy is active duty in the Army. We have been married for 5 years and have lived in 4 states. I have been blessed enough to work in Oklahoma, North Carolina, and now Georgia doing what I love most… teaching art to children. Having lived and taught in different states, I am very familiar with incorporating visual art standards as well as Common Core standards to my own lesson plans. I understand how important collaboration with classroom teachers is, and I’ve been able to show administration and co-workers how art class can enhance or build upon what students are doing in the classroom in a creative and expressive manner. I have been using DSS lessons since I started teaching, and they truly have made teaching art even more enjoyable and fun. I am so excited to contribute to this wonderful program.  I hope you join me by welcoming Marisa to the DSS family!   The Members Club is designed to save you time...

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How to Talk to Kids about Art – Art Made Easy 019

How to Talk to Kids about Art – Art Made Easy 019

By on May 11, 2016 | 4 comments

Do you hit the google search button whenever you need to introduce a famous artist before an art lesson? I know I’ve filled the white board with a few boring facts a few times. What if I told you you didn’t have to research a thing about a famous artist? Today’s guest, Cindy Ingram from The Art Curator for Kids website, shares her philosophy of how she talks to kids about art and ways that you can too. And you don’t have to know a thing about art!   IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL LEARN: –  How Cindy’s childhood dreams translated into her success as an art curator – Cindy’s best tips to help children compare and contrast art – How letting children discover art and answer the questions about art by analyzing it themselves – Bonus tip: How to introduce Picasso, Jackson Pollock, Edvard Munch to your students! – Why Cindy loves teaching Baroque art – The best artists to introduce to children at an elementary school level – How to utilize your classroom time to its full potential – Ways to partner with a classroom teacher to help introduce an artist with a broader scope – How to use Bloom’s Taxonomy to analyze art – Whether you should show nudity pieces in the classroom – How to balance art history and creating art in limited amounts of time -Why character analysis help children with critical thinking – The tips and tricks for parents taking children to museums and how to engage the children through questions LISTEN TO THE SHOW     DOWNLOAD THIS FREE GUIDE   SHOW NOTES: Cindy’s Top Tips for Looking at Art Art Curator for Kids Visual Thinking Strategies Bloom’s Taxonomy Laurence Anhalt’s Artists Series Books Life Doesn’t Frighten Me by Maya Angelou (with art by Basquiat) Don Massey’s blog, Shine Bright Zamarano (Check out Don’s blog for amazing tech art projects and art projects featuring local artists)   CONNECT WITH CINDY You can connect with Cindy on Facebook  and...

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How to Host Your Own Art Workshop – Art Made Easy 018

How to Host Your Own Art Workshop – Art Made Easy 018

By on May 4, 2016 | 5 comments

Do peers ever ask you to share your teaching secrets?  Do you specialize in an area of art-making? Does generating extra income sound appealing? If there is a yes in there somewhere, this episode is for you. In this episode, I unpack how I developed and executed my successful Art Workshop. I break down the process from the idea to how to book a facility to structuring the projects plus much more. This process may sound scary or unrealistic to some of you. You maybe asking why anyone would attend your workshop, let alone pay for one. But they will. You can put on a small event with 10 teachers or a large one with 50! This show is for anyone who has a desire to share their art experience through a workshop and earn extra income in the process. After you listen to the show, make sure to download my free Art Workshop Guide that will help you plan YOUR own art workshop.   LISTEN TO THE SHOW:       HOW TO HOST YOUR OWN ART WORKSHOP Here are some common questions you may ask yourself as you think about whether you should host your own workshop: How many people should I have and where will I host it? Workshops can be as small as just a few people or as large as a couple of hundred—or more. – Less than 10 people allows you to host the workshop in your home. -10-25 means you’ll need a larger room like a neighborhood club house or classroom at school – 25-75 means you’ll need to rent a space in a school, community center, etc. – Larger than that and you’ll need to look for facilities that specialize in events for larger groups. Popular choices are hotels and colleges and universities. What qualifications do I need to have? You may wonder what qualifications you need to host your own workshop especially if you are charging a fee. As far as I am concerned, you don’t need any special qualification to teach what you know. Other than being good at what you do, people will either pay you for your skills or not. What should I teach? This is entirely up to you. Sometimes you don’t know what you are really good at until someone points...

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Teaching from a Cart – Art Made Easy 017

Teaching from a Cart – Art Made Easy 017

By on Apr 27, 2016 | 13 comments

Do you teach art from a cart? Or travel from school to school with your car packed with art supplies and resources? Today’s guest Heidi O’Hanley has spent most of her career traveling from school to school and teaching from a cart. It sounds impossible and maybe even a bit scary, but Heidi is here to help you. Heidi blogs at Tales from the Traveling Art Teacher and shares what art projects are best, what art supplies to use and ways to make teaching art with little storage or space to work for you. IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL LEARN: – What to do when your classroom has no water source, and how your students can play an active role in the solution – Why communication is crucial when teaching art from a cart – How using Google Drive, Share Point and Pinterest can help with lesson planning – Helpful tips for when you’re teaching at multiple schools – What Heidi’s current blog is all about and how she came up with the name and concept – How using removable bins to hold supplies, how-to-draw books, resources & lessons plans makes traveling easier – The top questions Heidi gets asked by others about this type of art teaching – How to make clay project prep work when you are teaching art from a cart – The best part about teaching art from a cart – Why you should be proactive and set parameters before even starting a project – Easy cart projects to do, as well as the ones that you’ll find more challenging due to limitations   LISTEN TO THE SHOW     DOWNLOAD THIS FREE GUIDE I created this guide for you to act as a checklist for things to consider when teaching from a cart, what supplies are great for cart use and what type of projects work really well. Just click the yellow box below, enter your name and email and I will send you the free download to your email.   SHOW NOTES: Deep Space Sparkle’s tips for teaching art from a cart Vincent Van Gogh’s Cat Camille and the Sunflowers You Are My Work of Art Why Is Blue Dog Blue? Tar Beach Tales from the Traveling...

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Matisse-Inspired Backdrop

Matisse-Inspired Backdrop

By on Apr 25, 2016 | 7 comments

I really don’t know what happened. I was in the middle of writing copy for my newsletter when my eyes settled on a Matisse book. I have a large format one that’s meant for coffee tables so it’s quite a distraction. The next minute I was drawing large organic shapes and cutting them out wondering what I should do with them. And then of course, I was on my hands and knees painting the reverse side of my painted backdrop that I use for some of my videos. Sorry newsletter. You just weren’t intriguing enough. I don’t know if you make videos but it’s always fun to have a few backgrounds to capture the mood of your reels instead of shooting with a bed or a couch in the background. And by the state of my bed and my couch, I wouldn’t do that to you. I love Alisa Burke’s colorful backdrops, so she’s the real inspiration, not Matisse. If you don’t need the backdrop fro videos, I think it would make a fun backdrop for a photo booth. Perhaps I’ll bring it to my workshop this summer.   Would you like to make one? Here’s how:   THE DRAWING First off all, I used an old king size sheet painted with regular household latex paint. I placed the sheet on the garage floor over top of some painting drop cloths. This is necessary because the latex paint will seep through the fabric. I painted the sheet with an off-white as that’s what I had on hand. Bright white would be better if you had a choice. After the paint has dried, you can paint whatever you want on top of the white paint. I’ve done a few things like painted aqua swirls, which you can see here. For the Matisse backdrop, I drew some large organic shapes on 8 x 10 cardstock. You want at least two large scale shapes and a couple of medium shapes. The smaller shapes can be drawn directly onto the backdrop. Starting at the top of the sheet, trace the templates, mixing the order, turning up side down and reversing the shapes. If there is extra space, I added a round shape to fill the space. MIXING THE PAINT...

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5 Tips for Making Vibrant Paint Colors

5 Tips for Making Vibrant Paint Colors

By on Apr 21, 2016 | 6 comments

Do you ever wonder why some art projects look so vibrant? Perhaps you wondered what brand of paint results in such rich colors? What if I told you it’s not what, but how… I used to think that there was a special type of paint that I could order and squeeze into a palette until I discovered the secret of creating colorful paint hues. No matter what brand of paint you buy, don’t feel limited to paint with colors directly from the bottle. A world of color and creativity awaits. Try the next 5 tips for creating your own vibrant colors.   FUN COLOR TIP #1 – Squeeze a quarter-size amount of blue, red, yellow and white liquid tempera paint onto a styrofoam plate or egg carton. – With a brush, scoop up a little bit of yellow paint then scoop up some white. Mix the two paint colors onto a piece of art paper. What happens? Keep adding white paint to the brush and paint a new dot onto your paper. See how the color gets lighter and lighter? – This is called creating a tint. Tints works especially well on dark colored paper like black or navy blue.   FUN COLOR TIP #2 – Without rinsing your brush clean, scoop up a bit of red paint. Paint a dot on your paper. What happens? What color did you create? Because there is still white and yellow on the brush, the resulting red won’t be as pure. This is one of the tricks to creating vibrant colors…don’t clean the colors away with water.   FUN COLOR TIP #3 – Clean your brush and try mixing the red with the blue paint. What color did you get? – As you keep adding more colors, the lighter colors fade away. You can keep adding dark colors or you can dip paint brush back into the white paint to create a new tint. It helps to mix from light to dark. Light colors are easily blended with the dark so less muddy colors result in the efforts. FUN COLOR TIP #4 – Use a styrofoam egg carton to create a colorful palette. – Squeeze a dime size amount of as many colors as you want into each...

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5 Mindset Shifts That Made a Difference in My Life – Art Made Easy 016

5 Mindset Shifts That Made a Difference in My Life – Art Made Easy 016

By on Apr 20, 2016 | 31 comments

Why do things always seem to work out for some people and not for others? Do you have goals in your life that just don’t seem attainable? I’m a firm believer that you can achieve anything you want–happiness in your job, great relationship with your spouse, joy-filled hobbies–but there are some age-old philosophies that make it possible. This episode is a bit of a stretch for me. I don’t often talk about how I feel about ego or intuition and living a life with intention. But tapping into these two things has allowed me to know what path to take, what opportunities to say yes to and what to say no to. If you are searching to change things up a bit, I believe that there is a great deal of power in changing your mindset.  LISTEN TO THE SHOW: WHAT YOU’LL LEARN IN THIS EPISODE: – What might be holding you back and how to eliminate it. – How saying NO can change your life – How collaboration can open up possibilities in your life – Why it’s important to start giving without the expectation of receiving. – Understand how your ego and intuitions affect each other and how to recognize how egos can rule your thoughts. – How finding purpose and joy in just one thing a day can be transformational   INTERVIEW LINKS: The Lively Show with Jess Lively The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life’s Purpose  by Eckhart Tolle LISTEN TO THE...

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How to Draw with Kids & Create a Rockin’ YouTube Show – Art Made Easy 015

How to Draw with Kids & Create a Rockin’ YouTube Show – Art Made Easy 015

By on Apr 13, 2016 | 6 comments

Drawing with kids is probably the best job in the world which is exactly what Rob Jensen does with his three kids 5 days a week. After starting Art Hub for Kids in 2012, Rob shares his love of art with his kids by committing to a 5-day a week art show in YouTube. His success has been exponential. He shares his YouTube secrets of how to get subscribers, staying engaged with you audience and how to record your own art videos.   IN THIS SHOW YOU’LL LEARN: – The top three things you should look for in a camera – Learning about camera set up (including shooting from overhead) – How lighting affects your videos – The three things to look for when selecting a camera for shooting – Which editing programs are user friendly – Tips and tricks for editing and templates – Rob’s tips for growing your YouTube channel – Why it is important to build an email list and focus on your blog – How Rob uses social media   LISTEN TO THE SHOW:       SHOW NOTES: Rob’s website: Art Hub for Kids Rob’s YouTube channel The video Camera Rob uses: Canon vixia 320 Manfrotto 143A Magic Arm with Camera Bracket Canon VIXIA HF R700 Camcorder (Black)  (the 320 model Rob uses is out of stock) Harry Potter Paperback Box Set (Books 1-7)   Note: Rob’s Drawing Guide offer has...

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Foil Turtle and Fish Collage

Foil Turtle and Fish Collage

By on Apr 8, 2016 | 25 comments

This lesson was inspired by a lesson in The Usborne Book of Art Projects. It was a huge hit with my third grade class. The lesson in the book focused on fish but I thought a sea turtle would look lovely swimming in the glittery waters. Here’s How: Creating the Background There are a couple of ways to make the water background for the sea turtle and fish. One method is to use liquid or tray watercolors and table salt to make a traditional speckled background as shown above or you could use Mod-Podge and glitter liquid watercolor paints. To make a watercolor and salt background,  use 6″ x 9″ pieces of 90 lb watercolor paper and regular watercolor paints.  Wet the paper with a sponge or large brush, then mix blue and green watercolors onto the wet watercolor paper (wet-on-wet technique). Salting the surface will give the “ocean” a sparkly quality. I had some of the Mod-Podge glittery paints left over from the Fancy Fish Lesson, so I though I may as well use it up before it hardened and became unusable. The students brushed the leftover “glittery paint” onto a piece of blue or lavender drawing paper. The results were shimmery and ocean perfect. To make the glitter paint, combine a few table spoons of glitter liquid watercolors with about a ¼ cup of gloss Mod-Podge. Stir and use like regular paint. Drawing the Sea Turtle and Fish CLICK TO DOWNLOAD How to Draw a Sea Turtle Set the ocean paper aside and demonstrate how to draw some fish and sea turtles.  The idea is to keep the drawing very simple because the drawing will be created on tin foil. It may be helpful to do a practice drawing on a piece of paper cut to the same size of the tin foil. Use the drawing guide or show pictures of sea turtles and fish and allow the children to identify the basic shapes and colors from photographs. Coloring and Texture You’ll need some heavy weight tin foil (regular tin foil is fine), and some texture boards.  To make a texture board, cut heavy board (tag board, etc) into 9″ x 6″ rectangles.  Cut up old mesh vegetable bags and tape to cardboard. I made about 25 and had a...

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From Blog to Book- Art Made Easy 014

From Blog to Book- Art Made Easy 014

By on Apr 6, 2016 | 2 comments

Jeanette Nyberg, author of the popular art blog Craftwhack and former professional artist, traded in her paintbrushes for a keyboard after the birth of her kids. Discovering that her love of kid’s art was just as passionate as her former painting days, Jeanette started a blog that changed, transformed and ultimately lead her to her first book deal. In this episode, Jeanette shares her struggles with blogging and how she reigned in her focus that resulted in the publication of her first art book for kids and adults.   LISTEN TO THE SHOW       IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL LEARN:   How doing art projects for kids rekindled Jeanette’s passion for art That blogging is a “fine balance” Why you should do what resonates with YOU! Why people that teach art to children often make the best instructors for adults Jeanette’s process for writing her first book Collaborating with others can make a project more enjoyable Her best drawing tips!   INTERVIEW LINKS:  SITS Girls (The Secret is in the Sauce Blog) The Unmistakable Creative Podcast & website Zentangles Website   DOWNLOAD THE WORKSHEET Click on the yellow tab, enter your name and email and the free workshop will be sent to you…. THE BOOK…. Take a look at Tangle Art and Drawing Games for Kids: A Silly Book for Creative and Visual Thinking You can connect with Jeanette through her blog, Facebook and Instagram. Now it’s YOUR turn… I’d love to hear from you. In the comment section below, tell me what YOUR biggest struggle has been–in the classroom or in your blog–I’d love to hear what you struggle...

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Art Made Easy #013: The Scoping & Sequencing of Portrait-Making

Art Made Easy #013: The Scoping & Sequencing of Portrait-Making

By on Mar 30, 2016 | 3 comments

Creating a portrait in elementary school is a natural part of any art curriculum. Over my 13 years as an art teacher, I taught thousands of kids how to draw portraits–whether of themselves, a friend or an imaginary person. It may surprise you that teaching a child how to draw a portrait is not just about eye-placement or looking into a mirror, it’s also about how to create a piece of art that captures the likeness not just through drawing but with texture and color. In this episode of Art Made Easy, I identify key learning objectives for each grade level, detail what art supplies I love best plus how I select just the right portrait project that engages students at every grade. Make sure to download my FREE Scoping & Sequencing of Portrait Making PDF that details the projects, supplies and learning objectives for each grade level. Just login to your DSS account to access. You can create a free account if you don’t already have one.   LISTEN TO THE SHOW     DOWNLOAD THE FREE PORTRAIT-MAKING GUIDE: To download this free resource, click on the image below. Login to your DSS account and click Add to Cart. Enjoy!   SHOW NOTES – Information about the Summer Art Workshop with Patty, Palmer, Cassie Stephens and Laura Lohmann – Do You Have a Hat? by Eileen Spinelli – Fred Babb Art Go to Your Studio and Make Stuff (This is one of my all-time most inspiring poster books for art-making) – Fun with Portraits II Lesson plans – Fun with Portraits I...

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My NAEA 2016 Debrief…

My NAEA 2016 Debrief…

By on Mar 26, 2016 | 7 comments

Did you miss attending the NAEA Conference this year? I almost did. Just two weeks before the event, I purchased my ticket after realizing that this might be the only chance to meet with my Art Workshop co-teachers, Cassie and Laura, before the summer. Plus I wanted to meet Christa from Faber-Castell who provides art supplies for my summer workshop and who I have worked with this past year creating lessons. I’m so glad I went. This is what I did…. I going to confess up front that I didn’t attend one single session. Not a single one. Time was short. I arrived late Thursday afternoon, took an Uber to the Hilton and grabbed a coffee before heading to a Faber-Castell focus group for art teachers. As I was heading up the elevator, I ran into Laura, Cassie, Ginger (Paintbrush Rocket) and Jennifer (Nashville). How fun to meet these ladies for the first time. And I really felt like they were old friends. Love the online world. After the Faber-Castell meeting, I went out to dinner at Ralph Lauren with the Faber-Castell crew. We had the BEST  time. It was St. Patrick’s Day and things were rather crazy. Let’s just say we had 250lb men playing the bagpipes as we sipped wine and ate braised short ribs. On Friday, Laura and Cassie and I had our Breakfast Brainstorming sessions, planning the lessons and refining our theme for my Summer Art Workshop. It was amazing to sit back and listen to these ladies come up with ideas. I just had to sit back and listen. Inside I was giddy-happy for everyone who is coming to the event. They have no idea how much they are in for! Meeting my blogging friends at The Art of Ed booth in the convention center was the hi-light. I got to see my friend, Donna, met Amy and Marcia for the first time and had a chance to talk to art teachers about their programs and projects. In fact we talked so much that I missed my chance to attend the last sessions of the day. On Friday morning a group of us headed to breakfast chatted over green eggs and ham & strong coffee and headed...

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Easy Management Tips for Creating Your Dream Class – Art Made Easy 012

Easy Management Tips for Creating Your Dream Class – Art Made Easy 012

By on Mar 23, 2016 | 5 comments

Do your students blurt out at random moments during your demonstrations? Do you have trouble getting kids to listen or take you seriously? Do you have children that always seem to be pushing your buttons? Does your clean-up routine border on chaotic? I know that I’ve struggled with behavioral issues, stressful transitions and more than a few wild classes and I learned that unless I got those things under control, I wasn’t able to be an effective teacher. Although it may seem like achieving a happy balance between creating a consistent management philosophy and allowing freedom and creativity in your art room is next to impossible, I’m here to tell that it is completely doable. Michael Linsin is the author of Classroom Management for Art, Music, and PE Teachers and the author of the blog, Smart Classroom Management has the magic touch. He seems to know intuitively how to transform chaos into calm. A little word about the show… Podcasting is not as easy as it may appear. There are lot of steps to setting up interviews, recording and ultimately producing each episode that inevitable something always goes wrong. In this case, I had a problem with the sound quality on my end of the recording. My podcast editor had to do some fancy tweaking to make this interview easy on your ears. So if you notice any weird transitions, you know why. And as always, thanks for listening!   LISTEN TO THE SHOW   IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL LEARN: Why a classroom management plan is necessary and the most important element of the whole teaching process How good classroom management can free you to be creative How body language can be used to set the right tone in a classroom Why having expectations of your kids is absolutely essential to creating your dream class Why the story behind the activity is more important than the activity itself The truth why 95% of classroom problems will disappear  with an effective management plan The surprising things teachers do that unintentionally encourage bad behavior The #1 tip Michael has for all teachers looking to implement his system Here is an interview with Michael on Deep Space Sparkle  Classroom Management for Art, Music, and PE Teachers on Amazon Join Michael’s weekly newsletter here...

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Working Through Mistakes- Art Made Easy 011

Working Through Mistakes- Art Made Easy 011

By on Mar 16, 2016 | 7 comments

If you teach art to children, no doubt that you’ve come across a child who is unhappy with their work. Some children become rattled by a torn piece of paper or even a color choice. What can you do to help these children work through the sticky points of art-making? There is plenty of advice out there but sometimes the best way to help a child is to put yourself in their shoes.  In today’s show, I share my philosophy and how I approach frustrated artists, what I say and how I help children enjoy the creative process.   LISTEN TO THE SHOW   SHOW NOTES Beautiful Oops! The Dot   Mistakes are a part of art. As soon as we can teach children this concept, the more fun you will have as an art teacher and the more creative the students will be. I can’t say where children get this notion that everything must be done correctly, but it certainly resides in many children’s heads. Some children are wired this way. I can see the battles some children create in their heads; these are the children where life is black and white, lines are either straight or crooked. There is very little doubt in this kid’s head that a drawing is correct or not. I don’t consider this a wrong state of being, but rather a child expressing his authentic self. My middle son is very exact. Everything he views in the world has a purpose and most concepts and ideas are linear. There is a correct sequence for everything. He was like this at 6 and he is the same at 16. Is he artistic? Nope. Not at all. But so what? He still enjoyed art at school because he was able to set aside his wired state and have some fun with his drawings without judgement. He loved directed drawing lessons because well, they were directed. You either did them right, or wrong (in his opinion, not mine!) So how do you see that mistakes are important to some children and that it’s not a reflection of you? It’s not easy, but I think it comes down to trust. I know my students. Well, the truth is, I often forget...

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Tips for Running an After-School Art Program – Art Made Easy 010

Tips for Running an After-School Art Program – Art Made Easy 010

By on Mar 9, 2016 | 6 comments

Kathy Barbro was one of the first art educators to offer online art resources through her site, Art Project for Kids.  No doubt you have seen or purchased her wonderful artist-inspired collaborative murals for your students to color. After speaking with Kathy for the first time in January, I realized there was so much more to Kathy than how-to-draw handouts. Kathy is a busy gal. Not only does she teach full-time in Southern California and manages her blog, but she runs a thriving after-school art program. This is where we spent some time. Kathy shares her story of how her after-school program works, how she manages the time and how the financial benefit of the after-school program has changed her life. This episode is for anyone wishing to learn more about the logistics of operating an after-school art program as well as teaching tips from one of the best art teachers around. Make sure to download Kathy’s free After-School Art Program How-to Guide. She shares exactly how she runs the program and shares what her flyers look so that you may be inspired to do the same. Kathy is truly the most wonderful, giving people I know.  I hope you enjoy getting to meet her.   LISTEN TO THE SHOW IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL LEARN: – How Kathy came up with the idea to sell art murals on her blog Art Project for Kids – What Kathy does to be able to teach art all day, teach an after-school program and run a successful online business – How to add more variety and keep kids engaged in your after school art program – How Kathy uses Model Magic to engage her students – What a typical after school program art class looks like for Kathy – The steps to starting an afterschool program at your school – Why it’s so important to do what you enjoy when teaching art projects – Kathy’s thoughts on focus time for kids, and the perfect length for each lesson – What kept Kathy motivated with her blog, and the best blog platform for someone just starting out – How to incorporate social media into your business and a resource that can help you do this...

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Ancient Dwellings Rock Art

Ancient Dwellings Rock Art

By on Mar 6, 2016 | 2 comments

This art project offers kids the opportunity to create their own rock art petroglyphs using terra cotta clay scraps and white paint. And the best part is that the project takes less than 45-minutes. To start, read your favorite ancient rock art book. I picked up a copy of Ancient Dwellings of the Southwest in Arizona but there are many other books that illustrate the art of our earliest habitants. This is a project that is perfect for air dry clay. Sometimes with air dry clay, the small details in a work of art can be chipped off, but this flat shape is safe from the typical perils of it dry clay. Purchase terra cotta clay and you’ll make the project even easier to do (and more authentic). I gave each student a handout of petroglyph drawings. If you don’t have one, you can download one from a site similar to this one or make your own. We practiced etching with a wooden dowel on clay and then they drew their petroglyph on their clay square (about 3″ x 3″). It would be far easier to just paint the image on the square but it didn’t really occur to me at the time, so etching is what we did. After the students etched their design, they use white underglaze to paint on top. If you are using air dry clay, using acrylic paint or even liquid tempera paint would work very well. I fired the clay rock tile since they were dry. No glaze is needed. Here’s what my group of second graders created: If you are looking for a more detailed lesson on cave paintings, take a look at...

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Hawaiian Dancers Art Project

Hawaiian Dancers Art Project

By on Mar 4, 2016 | 2 comments

What you’ll need: 12″ x 18″ white drawing paper (or watercolor paper if you have it) Black water-proof marker (I use Sharpie brand) Watercolor paints (I use liquid watercolors but pan watercolors are fine) Colored markers Tissue paper Optional: small silk flowers, leaves or decorations Drawing the Dancers The steps for drawing the dancers are varied, depending on how you like to draw. For me starting with a letter “U” about a hands length down from the top of the paper works best. Some kids will draw this letter large and some will draw it small. The resulting figures will be based on whatever size created, so make sure you reinforce the notion that all sizes are just fine. I leave the face for now and go directly to the neck. After the neck, draw shoulders. I emphasize that the male dancers have broad shoulders and the female dancers have small shoulders. Next comes a trick I learned as a fashion illustrator. It brought about a few laughs but basically it gets the job done. Just below the shoulders, add two dots (one below the left shoulder and one below the right). So you can see why the giggles, but these dots are guidelines for the torso.From those two “dots”, draw a line, slanting inwards, to create the waist. For the female the slant is more exaggerated, for the male, not so much. Now that we have shoulders and a torso, its safe to draw arms. I give a few options here, so you might want to do the same. After the arms, draw a skirt or in the case of the male, a sash. Draw the legs and then go back and draw a head piece first then the hair. Facial features are next and then the background. I put up a few Tropical scenes to give the children ideas, but basically they knew what they wanted.     After the drawings are complete, use markers to color in any small areas. It doesn’t make sense to color in large areas with markers, as painting with watercolors is much faster. Hand out pans of watercolor paint. I had a few bottles of glitter watercolor paint and it worked really well with this lesson....

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Paper Cut Molas

Paper Cut Molas

By on Mar 3, 2016 | 7 comments

Molas are cloth panels that form part of a blouse for the Kuna women of Panama. They use a quilting technique called reverse appliqué to create the design formalizers of fabric. Because I used to be (and hope to be again!) a quilter, I know all about reverse applique. It’s a pretty fun to do but darn hard to explain to kids. After a few attempts I decided that it’s just best to say that a Mola is a fabric panel with colorful strips sewn in. Sometimes it’s best to keep it simple. Take a look at this blog, Postcards from Panama. There are some wonderful photographs of Molas. I wish I could see them in person. Aren’t they wonderful?   How to Make a Paper Mola I used the project in the book, Dynamic Art Projects for Children by Denise M. Logan as inspiration and used the wonderful handouts that accompany the project. You can also create your own.  I showed the kids how to start their drawings but drawing the main body or largest shape first. After a few quick demos on the board, the students picked their favorite Mola shape and drew their image onto a piece of 12″ x 18″ white paper using a black marker. I like broad tip Crayola markers for coloring. I set a tray of them on each table group then demonstrated proper marker technique. Take a look at this video that shows how I color drawings. It really helps to trace around a shape and then color slowly; giving ample time for the ink to flow onto the paper. After image is colored, cut it out. Glue colored piece onto black construction paper and glue strips of paper along the borders. Tip: leave a little space between the colored drawing and the strips of paper. Fifth Grade Paper...

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Art Made Easy #009: From Art Educator to Art Entrepreneur

Art Made Easy #009: From Art Educator to Art Entrepreneur

By on Mar 2, 2016 | 2 comments

Megan Schiller is the founder of The Art Pantry, a design studio specializing in children’s creative play spaces. She is a former Reggio-inspired preschool teacher and art educator and her mission is to encourage creative independence and learning through inspired spaces. Megan works one-on-one with people in Northern California looking to set up creative play spaces in their homes or schools She has launched a series of DIY guides that are available through her site. In today’s episode, Megan talks about her evolution from a preschool art teacher to offering art classes in her home to a designer of creative spaces.  This show is for anyone who wants to learn how to set-up creative spaces for children and learn the pros and cons of a creative blogging career.   IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL LEARN: – What is the Reggio Emilia approach to art – How Megan used her passion for art to start a business and introduce a new concept to her neighborhood – The online program that both Megan and Patty used to successfully develop their businesses – How Megan takes everything that she learned as a preschool teacher and art teacher, and merges it with interior design – Why it’s important to have art supplies accessible and in the view of young children – How Megan sets up art with an invitation to create focus and how this can be incorporated into a classroom setting – Clean-up hacks you can use – Why you don’t need to blog everyday – Megan’s advice on starting a small business that can save you time and money   LISTEN TO THE SHOW     DOWNLOAD MEGAN’S FREE GUIDE:   SHOW NOTES The Art Pantry website Rachelle Doorley’s #Creativetable Instagram challenge How to Clean up Messy Art  Post on The Art Pantry or watch this video Marie Forleo (B-School) Smart Passive Income podcast with Pat Flynn Jess Lively Podcast The Good Life Podcast Family Adventure Podcast   You can connect with Megan through her blog, The Art Pantry and on Instagram and...

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Dr. Seuss Day Art Activities

Dr. Seuss Day Art Activities

By on Feb 28, 2016 | 1 comment

  Celebrate Dr. Seuss Day in Deep Space Sparkle style with this easy-to-draw Cat in the Hat. Start with a pencil, eraser, black marker and a white piece of paper and use the following media suggestions to complete the piece: Kindergarten through Second Grade Give children a white piece of paper (12″ x 18″) and use the free drawing instructions (download below) to draw the cat in the hat. The cat drawing is a bit tricky for Kinders so try this adjustment: follow the instructions by folding the paper, drawing the eyes and adding a nose but draw a large letter U instead of the ¾ view head. This makes more sense for a Kinder and the next parts (mouth, neck, bow tie and hat) will be easier. I like to give the children another price of white paper to paint the background. If you have a fairly independent group, allow them to create any type of pattern background they want. Try polka dots, stripes, chevrons, etc. Take a look at this adaptation of a simpler version of the cat made by my friend Kathy and her Kinder students in Santa Barbara. Third and Fourth Grade Many second graders and all third and fourth graders are able to draw the ¾ view Cat very well. Have some fun with this lesson by adding different patterns to the hat. The Cat in the Hat Meets Miro Kathy Barbro from Art Projects for Kids uses famous artists to inspired the hat decorations. Isn’t this Miro-inspired Cat in the hat the best? Perhaps your students can decorate the cat’s hat in a style made famous by an artist. Imagine a Van Gogh Starry Night hat or a Romero Britto Pop Art hat. Or maybe try a Georgia O’Keeffe close-up flower or a Matisse inspired organic shapes. Another option for a background is to paint colorful stripes with a little bling. I have to admit that adding some glitter here and there really is fun for the kids 9and me!). Download this drawing handout to help your students draw The Cat in the Hat by clicking the red banner below the...

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Art Made Easy #008: Secrets of a Teachers Pay Teachers Top Seller

Art Made Easy #008: Secrets of a Teachers Pay Teachers Top Seller

By on Feb 24, 2016 | 7 comments

Have your colleagues ever told you how well you explained a lesson? Or how creative you are? Do people always ask you for advice? If any of these questions ring true for you then you need to listen to this episode. Jennifer White shares how she went from teaching during the day and working as a cashier at night to making $14K in her first THREE months of selling her craft products on Teachers Pay Teachers. Crazy, right? I know I sound like an informercial, but I guarantee you that Jennifer is humble yet strategic about her success. I loved talking to Jennifer and appreciate her willingness to help you create the side job of your dreams. This episode is for anyone who is thinking of selling digital products on Teachers Pay Teachers or wishes to make a bigger impact with small easy tweaks to existing products. LISTEN TO THE SHOW   IN THIS EPISODE YOU WILL LEARN – Jennifer’s strategy for teaching a directed line drawing – How this type of drawing can be used as a confidence booster for kids – A technique you can use to keep the little ones on track, and on the same page – How Jennifer got into Teachers Pay Teachers  and the effect this website has had on her life – Jennifer’s best tips for navigating the site – Advise on designing a new product to sell online, and how to “breathe new life” into an older product that you’re offering – Who should pay for advertising on Teachers Pay Teachers – How to discount and hold a sale, the right way – Whether or not you should sign up for a free account on Teachers Pay Teachers, or become a premium member     Jennifer spoke at the most recent Teachers Pay Teachers Conference in Las Vegas and wants to share her conference presentation download with you! To access the download, just enter your email and your name. The guide will be delivered to your email address. Note: By entering your name, you will automatically be subscribed to the free DSS weekly newsletter, but know that you can unsubscribe at any time.  You can connect with Jennifer on her blog at First Grade Blue Skies, through Instagram and Facebook. Despite the fact...

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Art Made Easy 007: How to Create a Thematic Art Unit with Laura Lohmann

Art Made Easy 007: How to Create a Thematic Art Unit with Laura Lohmann

By on Feb 17, 2016 | 2 comments

Have you ever wondered how art teachers come up with so many fabulous lessons? Today I talk to Laura Lohmann from the blog, Painted Paper, on her strategy for designing & implementing her amazing school-wide thematic units. She walks you through the steps she uses to select a year long art theme, strategies that go into designing the curriculum and how she creates the projects with her students. You can download a free worksheet that will help you design the art curriculum of your dreams! This episode is for anyone who wants to learn how design a thematic art unit from the early research stages to implementation in the art room.    LISTEN TO THE SHOW     IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL LEARN: – How Laura sets up her art room for multi-class mural making – How many students Laura teaches and what her schedule looks like – Laura secret to high engagement in the art room – The brand of paint Laura swears by – How to make painting work in your classroom and the secret that will make the process effortless – How Laura structures her art class – How Laura plans her curriculum and when she starts (this might surprise you!) – Tips for teaching art from a cart – Tying in the elements of art and state standards – Literacy connections – Clean-up strategies   SHOW NOTES Alisa Burke Kezz Brett Texture Tools from Lakeshore Blick premium Tempera Paint Crayola Premium Paint How to Create a Mural A few Mexican Inspired Projects A few Art Projects inspired by India     If this show inspired you, please subscribe to Art Made Easy in iTunes and leave a rating or review. This helps the podcast get recognized by more creative people like yourself. Thank you so much! You can find Laura through Instagram @paintedpaperintheartroom, through her blog Painted Paper and her amazing store on Teachers pay Teacher...

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Sketchbook Project #7: Farm Animals

Sketchbook Project #7: Farm Animals

By on Feb 16, 2016 | 1 comment

The Sketchbook Project is a record of how my sixth grade students used sketchbooks during their art class to record art information and create projects. Learn how I used sketchbooks instead of individual sheets of paper to teach art & creativity. Week One: The Beginning Week Two: Creating Value Week Three: Atmospheric Perspective Week Four: Tree Line Drawings Week Five: Sonia Delaunay Abstract Art Week Six: Portrait Journalling Week Seven: Line drawings   WHAT WE DID: Drawing animals is a favorite art subject for pretty much every child. Children love to draw their pet and can often do so with ease, but drawing an unfamiliar animal takes some practice. For this project, I wanted to offer my 6th graders the opportunity to explore farm animals. I gathered some books, of which Farm Anatomy by Julia Rothman remains my favorite. The strategy for this project was to encourage the kids to use their sketchbook to practice drawing a few animals. I photocopied animal pictures from books and placed some photographs on the white board. I asked the kids to draw at least 3 different animals, or one animal 3 different ways. The intention was to push them out of any comfort zones they may have. After they sketched a few animals, they selected which animals they wanted to develop further. Using pencils, the kids drew their animal(s) in an art-style of their choice. This was the fun part. Some kids created farm scenes, others created pop art animals, others went 3-D…so many options! And with many of the Sketchbook projects in this series, I allowed the kids to use whatever coloring medium they wanted. Some used markers, pencil crayons, watercolor paints and others went the collage route. I have to admit, that this project produced the most varied results. The kids LOVED choosing their own medium. At first I worried that allowing the children to move around the art room to gather supplies from the art cupboards would result in chaos, but the opposite happened. They were quick and deliberate. They put their own supplies back when class was over. They were empowered with their freedom (as most 6th graders are) and for me it resulted in a lively art-making session. I don’t know if this fits in with the choice-based classroom...

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“Antiqued” Oil Pastel Flowers in a Vase

“Antiqued” Oil Pastel Flowers in a Vase

By on Feb 12, 2016 | 8 comments

Recognize this beauty? This was the one of the first lesson I posted on my writing blog back in 2007 before Deep Space Sparkle existed. Such classics should be given due credit, don’t you think? Create this sophisticated bouquet with your little ones to celebrate Valentine’s Day. Here is a great way to teach watercolor resist. It’s simple and involves a surprise at the end. On the white board, demonstrate how to draw a vase, a table line, then circles for the center of the flowers. Give the students different options for drawing the petals. Ask the kids to choose a favorite color from the pastel palette with the rule that it should be a dark color. This helps the drawings stand out after the watercolor is applied. The kids then draw their vase, table line, flower centers, petals, leaves and stems. Using any color they wish, color in the shapes. When the kids are about halfway through their coloring (slow part), demonstrate the next step. This provides great motivation to complete the coloring portion. SCRUNCH THE PAPER Demonstrate how to take their beautifully colored picture and scrunch it. Because the paper is stiff, the kids literally have to sit on their crushed balled of paper or push really hard with their hands in order to get the required wrinkles. After smoothing out the paper, the kids apply a watercolor wash to the entire surface. TEACHING TIPS A tempera wash doesn’t work. Liquid watercolor is best. I put out two containers of wash; one brown and one blue. The kids can chose which one they like. When the wash settles in the wrinkles, it gives the picture an “antiqued” look. Do you have left-over coffee or tea? Try brushing the cold beverage over the paper to see what happens. The paper will become quite soggy, so leave on testable to prevent tearing when lifted. After the paper dries a bit, you can transfer tho a drying rack. For a more colorful version of a bouquet, try this Watercolor Bouquet project. Perfect for kids ages 7-10. ART SUPPLIES You’ll need a 12″ x 18″ piece of white drawing paper (76lb) Oil Pastels (non water-soluble) Blue or brown liquid watercolor paints Or cold coffee and tea  ...

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