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Art Lessons by Subject

<p>Elementary art lessons </p>

Sparkler Spotlight: Gina Bogomol

Sparkler Spotlight: Gina Bogomol

By on Mar 24, 2017 | 3 comments

The exciting part of Deep Space Sparkle’s Members Club is the chance to see what art teachers around the globe are creating with their students. The community group literally blows up everyday with postings of the latest art bundle experiments. My favorite part of my day is when I pour my coffee and browse through the daily uploads. One of our members, Gina Bogotol from Saint-Petersburg, Russia has been on my radar for a while. She’s that type of teacher: everything she does is crazy good and makes us wish we were a student her class. She recently submitted a gallery of Klimt-inspired women based on two projects from the Klimt Bundle. Golly. It was devine. I loved it so much that wanted to learn more about Gina aand what it’s like teaching art in Russia. Here’s what she said: Thank you Patty for inspiration and desire to share your experience with others. I’m from Saint-Petersburg, Russia. I graduated from State Pedagogical University, Art Department. Now I work at the International Academy of Saint-Petersburg. We have students from many countries. Some of them come to Russia just for a short period of time. This is my 12th year of teaching art at school in general, and 4th year at IA. Our school works upon request of the American education system, so it was all new for me as a new teacher when I just started there. I worked in a small Russian school before. Therefore I had all reasons to start searching internet for resources. I had no idea of how to teach in American school. What a relief it was when I found DSS two or three years ago. Terrific! It helped me so much! It was just the best, so close to my style, so easy to adopt for my lessons. Your blog became my favorite resource, it helps me to teach my students in a more accessible way, which is not always easy for the artists ( when you know how it should be, but sometimes do not know how to explain). It saved and keeps saving a lot of my time. I teach K-12 and after school group twice a week (about 20 lessons every week), and I always have to...

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Paint Like Monet

Paint Like Monet

By on Feb 13, 2017 | 3 comments

ABOUT CLAUDE MONET When Monet was young, he noticed that painters created dark and very serious art during this time. Subjects like history and religion bored him. He preferred bright colors that showed scenes from everyday life. Monet started to paint pictures with loose and sketchy strokes. Many people thought that his work wasn’t complete, but Monet didn’t care. He continued to paint the way he saw the world. Claude Monet was the first painter in the Impressionist movement. The word IMPRESSIONISM comes from one of Monet’s first paintings called Impression: Sunrise. Art critics labelled the painting, impressionism, in order to mock it but the term stuck. It now means painting with light. Monet liked to paint series of the same images with the only difference being how the light fell on the subject during certain times of the day.  He painted over 30 paintings of the haystacks near his home. TRY THIS LESSON: I love lessons that expose a pattern to an otherwise complicated painting. When you first look at Monet’s painting, The Isle Grande Jatte, 1878, it looks rather complicated and daunting to paint. But when you layer the artwork and outline the simple lines of the background first, then add the foreground at the very end, it becomes manageable. HERE’S WHAT YOU’LL NEED: 12″ x 18″ regular white drawing paper (I use Tru-Ray) Liquid tempera paints (white, green, yellow, blue, black) Colored oil pastels medium round brush Small pointed round brush and black tempera paint WHAT TO DO: On a white sheet of paper, draw a simple HORIZON LINE. This operates the water from the sky. Then, draw a hill line over the horizon line. Add a few simple homes/barns and buildings with oil pastels. With a sky color paint (Monet often used yellow tones for the sky) paint a sky. Paint the hills with a muted green color. Paint the water, using white, blues and greens. Keep in mind that Monet painted choppy reflections in the water. have children copy the colors of the buildings and use paint to make dappled marks in the water. Use a small brush and the watered down black tempera paint to paint the trees. Watch the video to see how the trees...

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Candy Hearts Valentine’s Day Project

Candy Hearts Valentine’s Day Project

By on Jan 31, 2017 | 9 comments

No doubt you have access to a few candy hearts right about now. I know I do, so instead of gobbling them up, I decided to turn these sweet pastel treats into an art project. This lesson is a great way for kids in grades 3 and above to observe a color and try to replicate the value. You can free-draw the heart or use a template. The older the child, the easier it is to draw a large heart. Drawing a heart big enough to paint inside is the goal so if you notice that some children are struggling with drawing the heart, use a template. WHAT YOU’LL NEED: Grab some liquid tempera paints, paper plates, 6″ white paper squares, a pencil, a black marker and of course, a few sweet heart candies. CREATING VALUE Tints are created by mixing white to any hue (color).  This might seem rather boring but I tell you, kid’s LOVE watching white paint do it’s magic on a color. It really is all about the paint mixing here, so if you can give each child a small paper plate in which to explore the painting mixing, please do. Place a quarter size dollop of white paint in the center of each child’s plate. Place a candy heart (random colors) on the plate and then squirt a dime-sized dollop of the candy color on the plate too. Some colors like light teal require three colors: white, turquoise and yellow. For older students, using COMPLEMENTARY colors adds an authentic darker tone or SHADE to use as the contrast. Although, it just might be easier to use less white for the darker parts of the candy hearts. Mix the white and colors together until the color is the same as the candy heart. PAINTING THE HEART Painting the heart is very quick because the paper size is small (6″ x 6″). This allows the child to create more than one heart. If you are doing this lesson with younger kids (ages 6-8) use a larger 10″ x 10″ paper. The bigger area is more forgiving. Where the shadows lies on the heart, use a darker color to add as the contrast. When the heart is...

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Gustav Klimt: Master of Metallics

Gustav Klimt: Master of Metallics

By on Dec 5, 2016 | 4 comments

Introducing Gustav Klimt to your students is really like opening up a pot of gold. There are so many interesting facets to his art and his life. One of the most impactful pieces to his story is how many of his works were destroyed by the Germans during WWII. Medicine, painted in 1900-1907 was destroyed along with a few others. I recently picked up a book that features beautiful Klimt-inspired illustrations. If you are doing a lesson on Klimt and in particular, his Tree of Life, I encourage you to find a copy of this book. Perfect for grade 3 and...

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Mola-Inspired Holiday Stockings

Mola-Inspired Holiday Stockings

By on Dec 4, 2016 | 0 comments

Part culture, part color theory and all fun, this Mola-inspired Holiday Stocking will keep the kids busy drawing, cutting and composing their own colorful stockings. ABOUT MOLAS Molas are cloth panels that form part of a blouse for the Kuna women of Panama. They use a quilting technique called reverse appliqué to create the designs in the fabric. Because I used to be (and hope to be again!) a quilter, I know all about reverse appliqué. It’s pretty fun to do but darn hard to explain to kids. After a few attempts I decided that it’s just best to say that a Mola is a fabric panel with colorful strips sewn in. USING MOLAS IN THE ART ROOM Art teachers all over the world incorporate Mola art into their curriculum to help children connect with the process and purpose of creating art. Sometime art becomes abstract for kids if all we do is teach our students that art is about history and famous artists. Art can be found all around us: where we live, our clothing and everyday objects. One way to do this is by understanding THE STEPS to making a Mola-Inspired project: Draw Mola image with basic shapes and rainbow or echo lines. Molas are made up of basic, recognizable shapes: turtle, sun, flower, fish, etc. Notice that the Mola has a basic center shape and then lines are drawn around this shape to create the recognizable image. In the Mola above, the turtle starts out as an OVAl. Lines are drawn around the oval to create the head and four legs. Repeat the drawing of lines until you have the shape desired. Add vertical or horizontal strips of paper to achieve the decorative background. This can also be achieved using construction paper crayons or oil pastels. DOWNLOAD A FREE MOLA STOCKING PROJECT   ARE YOU A MEMBER? The Mola-Inspired Stocking full project tutorial plus hundreds of lesson plans, art resources and videos is included with your monthly membership. Enrollment opens January...

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How to Draw & Paint a Turkey

How to Draw & Paint a Turkey

By on Nov 17, 2016 | 21 comments

Need a quick and easy 40-minute art lesson for your Kinders or first grade class? For the last day of my Fall rotation, Kinders created these adorable thanksgiving turkeys. I hadn’t done a guided drawing lesson with this group yet, but since they have all settled down and have become quite good listeners, I figured a directed line drawing lesson was due. You’ll need a 12″ x 18″ piece of sulphite paper, black oil pastels, colored oil pastels, liquid watercolor paint, craft feathers, white glue and a small plastic container lid. Want to know where I get my supplies? Download this handy guide. Watch this short how-to video: How to draw a turkey… I must admit that my own version of a Thanksgiving turkey looks more like a peacock than a turkey, but at the time, it was the best I could do. I experimented with a few body shapes before deciding that tracing a container top was the best way to begin this lesson with my Kinders. I was not alone with this assessment. A group of students who like to help me prep in the morning all agreed that tracing a circle was not only far cuter than my previous sample and they liked the simpler lesson for their little buddies. Who’s to argue with sixth grade girls? Another KEY component in helping this project along was to fold the paper in half to create a crease line. You might think this is silly but for my group of Kinders, many have low spatial awareness and although we’ve been working hard on this, many drawings tend to start way at the bottom of the paper. Have you experienced this? Thought so.   Need a handout?   DOWNLOAD FREE DRAWING PDF FROM THE SHOP So, to draw a turkey…. Fold paper in half to achieve a crease line and place container template on top of the crease line. This helps not only center the turkey but sets the stage for the turkey’s size. Trace container top with a black oil pastel. Draw two dots for eyes and an upside down triangle for a beak. Place oil pastel on crease line right next to the head and draw a BIG, FAT belly. Go all the way around to the other...

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