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Drawing with Glue

Watercolor Leaves Resist Project

Watercolor Leaves Resist Project

By on Oct 10, 2012 | 37 comments

A simple, yet lovely art lesson that builds upon the principles of watercolor applications. My fifth grade students used liquid watercolor paints, “black” glue (white school glue mixed with black paint) and 9″ x 12″ 90 lb watercolor paper and a bit of table salt to achieve this lovely project. To start, the students drew leaves onto their watercolor paper with a pencil. They used light strokes and tried to capture details. We don’t have fall leaves in Santa Barbara right now, so we used a photographs and photocopies of pictures. After the drawing, glue was carefully applied to the pencil lines. If a student misses this portion, they can outline their drawings with a black oil pastel, which will give them almost the same look and function (providing a wall for the watercolor paints). After the glue dries, paint leaves with two to three colors of paints. I stressed mixing colors that were beside each other on the color wheel. For the background, the children painted colors opposite to their leaves. Before the background paint dries, sprinkle a small amount of table salt over the wet surface. The kids can control where they would like to have the sprinkles of salt but encourage a light application. Much easier to remove after the paint dries! Beautiful Fifth Grade Watercolor...

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Under-the-Sea Chalk and Glue Drawings

Under-the-Sea Chalk and Glue Drawings

By on Dec 11, 2008 | 22 comments

I discovered this lesson while browsing through the Artsonia site recently. Gulf Elementary in Cape Coral, Florida displayed this beautiful Under-the-Sea chalk art on their school page. Although no lesson plans accompanied the piece, I experimented and came up with my own. I used this lesson for fourth grade students, but could be used for a fifth and sixth as well. For younger grades, use an easier subject matter (maybe penguins or sunflowers) and the results will be equally as grand. Sea Creatures I passed out sample drawings of various sea life…dolphins, sharks, sea turtles, seahorses, fish, etc. Coloring books that you find at craft stores are especially helpful drawing aids. I demonstrate the basic principals in drawing the fish (I use the “shape” philosophy) and try to cover at least three different types (oval fish, elongated dolphins and round turtles). I encourage the kids to draw big, actually, I insist they draw big as they can because the glue will be applied next… Drawing with Glue Each student receives one piece of 12 x 18 black construction paper, a pencil, eraser and a bottle of white school glue. I demonstrate the technique for the tracing pencil lines with the glue. Basically, I tell them to use the glue bottle as they would a pencil. The orange tip is like the lead: touch the paper, don’t hover above it and squeeze carefully. After drawing the fish, sea turtle, etc (only one please!), trace the pencil lines with the glue. Lay papers flat on the floor until dry. Tip: If you have a drying rack that has a slight tilt, it’s wise to lay the pieces on the floor until the glue “sets”, then you can rack ’em up. Tip #2: Be careful the kids (or any wayward parent helper) don’t track footprints over the art. Yes, this happened to me. Chalk Pastel Once the white school glue dries, you will notice that the glue dries clear. This reveals the black paper underneath, making the glue appear to be black. Cool, huh? Using chalk pastel, the kids color in their fish, seaweed and the ocean. Apply the chalk right up close to the glue “wall”. This wall prevents the pastel from...

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“Fancy Cats” Art Lesson in Chalk and Glue

“Fancy Cats” Art Lesson in Chalk and Glue

By on Dec 31, 2007 | 4 comments

A classic glue and chalk pastel lesson. Using a 12″ x 18″ sheet of white or black construction paper, instruct the kids (directed art) how to draw a cat. You can come up with your own version. I encourage the kids to follow the directions in this lessons as problems arise if the kids don’t draw the cat big enough. The fun part is the glue. After the kids draw their cat, complete with clothes, crowns, jewelry, etc. it’s time to bring out the golden glue! I mix metallic paint with regular white glue (50/50). I demonstrate how to hold the bottle and squeeze the glue out so that it doesn’t glob, dribble or pool. The kids trace all their pencil lines with the golden glue and that’s it for the first half of this lesson. For the second half, the kids get to color in their masterpieces with colored chalk pastel. Encourage the kids to use only one finger for smudging and avoid using their entire hand…not great look. To finish the piece, the kids can go over any area that has been smudged too much. That way their cats can be as sparkly and fancy as they intended! The fancy cats seen here are from Mrs. Orr’s 2nd Grade class from...

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