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Organization

The Organized Art Teacher: Art Made Easy 037

The Organized Art Teacher: Art Made Easy 037

By on Jan 11, 2017 | 3 comments

Do you feel overwhelmed when you look at your stacks of lesson plans and project ideas? Ever wondered how other art teachers store their lesson plans and samples? And what is the best way to store artwork? Start the year off with an organized mindset by hearing how Patty organized her hundreds of lesson plans and stacks of student art. IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL LEARN:  Why it’s never too late to organize, regardless of what point in the year it is How mindset plays a key role in successful organization Why listening to how other art teachers do things is a good idea Why identifying your organizational style is the first step to take How different themes can be organized and used later as reference tools What my criteria for throwing things out involves What you can do with teaching samples so that they can be used in the classroom How to effectively divide your lessons on the masters How (and why) organization is moving from binders to being done on computers Why the first day of art class is the perfect time to make a student portfolio, and how do you make one? Subscribe to Art Made Easy and receive new episodes directly on your phone via your podcast Ap.  Note: If you have an iPhone, subscribe in iTunes. If you have an Android phone, subscribe in Stitcher.   DOWNLOAD THE ORGANIZED ART TEACHER PDF SHOW NOTES:  Evernote Dropbox Pinterest...

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Join me for a Free Training!

Join me for a Free Training!

By on Dec 31, 2016 | 6 comments

Imagine this… Open House, May 2016. A year’s worth of teaching, planning, and creating paid off. My room looked exactly how I wanted it to, and it was decorated from floor to ceiling with DSS art projects. Parents were literally in awe of what their 8 year-old children had created. The kids were beaming with pride, the parents were teary with gratitude, and I felt like a rock star! Amazing, right? We all want to feel this! This was posted in Facebook from from Michelle, a member in Deep Space Sparkle’s The Members’ Club. She went from not knowing a thing about art to creating art on a regular basis with her 2nd grade students. I couldn’t be happier for her and I want it for you, too. Start the new year with art projects that are guaranteed to engaged and inspire students. It’s a bold statement but I know that if you apply even three out of the five steps, you’ll experience an uptick in student behavior, less frustrated artists and projects that surprise kids with their artistic ability. RESERVE YOUR SEAT Here are the details: The 60-minute TRAINING focuses on: 5 Steps on how to identify the best projects for each grade level (K-6) What art supplies work best with each age group What skills are essential to learn in each grade plus much more. There’s a lot to cover, so I created a TRAINING WORKBOOK for you to download and fill out as we move through the training. You’ll receive an email with a link to download the workbook after you register.   A FEW MORE BONUSES… https://d3ndagut9sanks.cloudfront.net/Launch-D/TMC+L3+Webinar+LP.mp4 I’m a visual learner so I think it’s important to have something to download and keep. I created TWO art resources that will help you plan your art program. The first is a curriculum guide and skills checklist. It’s a super handy list of skills that you can expect children to be proficient at in each grade level. This helps when you are looking at a lesson and are trying to determine whether it will work for your group of kids. The second is a list of art supplies, where to buy them and most importantly, how to use them. I don’t make any...

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2017 ART CALENDAR

2017 ART CALENDAR

By on Dec 24, 2016 | 1 comment

Happy New Year to you all! My favorite part of the entire year is the sweet spot between Christmas and New Year. It’s my time to reflect and plan. I LOVE planning and although my great intentions don’t always pan out, they serve as a guide for me to follow. I created this Art Calendar years ago because I needed a quick glance at the special events, artist’s birthdays and special projects that I wanted to consider when creating my art curriculum. I had a lot of flexibility in the type of lessons I taught but keeping in sync with the school calendar was important. THE 2017 ART CALENDAR INCLUDES: US and Canadian Holidays Artist Birthdays Lesson Suggestions (with links to free posts) Art Project Idea Page Monthly Project Idea Chart HOW TO USE THE CALENDAR When I was teaching, I liked to photocopy the art calendar onto card stock and place in my Planner Binder. Every month, I would look forward to the next month to see what celebrations or artist birthdays I could incorporate. I didn’t try to celebrate every artist’s birthday or even do an art project for every celebration, but the calendar allowed me to see if it was possible. Because I worked in rotations, not every class or grade level would have the opportunity to celebrate special holidays. So if my second and third graders created holiday projects in December but my Fourth and Fifth graders weren’t scheduled until January, I made sure to plan Valentine’s Day projects for them. This was just a peculiarity of my schedule but the calendar really helped me see what was coming. WOULD YOU LIKE A COPY? Click the image below to access your FREE 2017 Art Calendar. I really hope that it is useful to you. If it is, I’d love to hear how you are using the calendar. You can share your photo’s in the Deep Space Sparkle Facebook Page. Join HERE. Enjoy your calendar and have an awesome + bright 2017!...

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Teaching from a Cart – Art Made Easy 017

Teaching from a Cart – Art Made Easy 017

By on Apr 27, 2016 | 13 comments

Do you teach art from a cart? Or travel from school to school with your car packed with art supplies and resources? Today’s guest Heidi O’Hanley has spent most of her career traveling from school to school and teaching from a cart. It sounds impossible and maybe even a bit scary, but Heidi is here to help you. Heidi blogs at Tales from the Traveling Art Teacher and shares what art projects are best, what art supplies to use and ways to make teaching art with little storage or space to work for you. IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL LEARN: – What to do when your classroom has no water source, and how your students can play an active role in the solution – Why communication is crucial when teaching art from a cart – How using Google Drive, Share Point and Pinterest can help with lesson planning – Helpful tips for when you’re teaching at multiple schools – What Heidi’s current blog is all about and how she came up with the name and concept – How using removable bins to hold supplies, how-to-draw books, resources & lessons plans makes traveling easier – The top questions Heidi gets asked by others about this type of art teaching – How to make clay project prep work when you are teaching art from a cart – The best part about teaching art from a cart – Why you should be proactive and set parameters before even starting a project – Easy cart projects to do, as well as the ones that you’ll find more challenging due to limitations   LISTEN TO THE SHOW     DOWNLOAD THIS FREE GUIDE I created this guide for you to act as a checklist for things to consider when teaching from a cart, what supplies are great for cart use and what type of projects work really well. Just click the yellow box below, enter your name and email and I will send you the free download to your email.   SHOW NOTES: Deep Space Sparkle’s tips for teaching art from a cart Vincent Van Gogh’s Cat Camille and the Sunflowers You Are My Work of Art Why Is Blue Dog Blue? Tar Beach Tales from the Traveling...

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Simple Tip for Keeping Artwork Organized

Simple Tip for Keeping Artwork Organized

By on Jan 4, 2015 | 5 comments

During my second round of facilitating my Teaching Art 101 e-course, a group of us were discussing organization in the art room. Just like most of the class participants, I struggled with sorting piles and piles of artwork. One gal piped up and said she used ordinary clothespins clipped to stacks of art projects to help separate classes. Isn’t that genius? Maybe you heard of this tip before or maybe you learned it from her, but whoever thought of this idea deserves a medal. But lazy me didn’t implement the clothespins until this Fall. I vowed I would be more organized this year so I got out this great little mini-set of acrylic paints that I received from a vendor at the NAEA convention and painted my collection of clothes pins. I used 7 different colors for seven grade levels. Once dry, I placed the bunch in a tray along with a sharpie marker and set beside my drying racks in the art room. I tacked up a clothes line to the wall and clipped colored clothespins to the string. When a group of paintings were placed on the drying rack, I wrote the name of the teacher plus grade level on the clothespin and then clipped the pin to the bottom of the stack. This way when I have two or more classes creating the same projects, I won’t get confused as to which painting belongs to which class. It does help to stack the artwork on separate racks. I have 4 small racks in my art room and each class takes up one rack plus a bit of overflow. It’s the overflow that always causes me sorting problems. So this is where I add most of the pins. Have you tried clothespins in your classroom? How do you use them? Share your...

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Teaching Art From a Cart

Teaching Art From a Cart

By on Oct 2, 2014 | 13 comments

There are no words more terrifying to hear for an art teacher than, “You will be teaching from a cart.” This is pretty much what happened to this reader:  This is my first year teaching and was kind of thrown into teaching art….Being a traveling art teacher with only 45 min with each class is making lessons very hard. Especially when I actually want the students to learn about art, not just do some crafts once or twice a week. Can you please give me some suggestions on what I can do? We’re working with lines and are about to start color, but using paint has me concerned with not having much time and not having my own room…I don’t really have time to trade out supplies either so my cart space is very limited. PLEASE HELP ME! While I don’t teach art via a cart now, I do have a bit of experience from my early days of teaching. Basically, when you are a visitor or guest in a classroom, you don’t have a lot of control over your teaching environment–at least physically–so being organize with your supplies, knowing how much prep space and display area you have as well as working with the classroom teacher to plan for drying and storing space is pretty important. First off, you are not alone. Many art teachers have to work within the confines of a cart and many do it very well. You can too! One of the first things I would do is to give yourself a chance to warm into your teaching logistics. Give yourself some time to get to know the teachers, the kids, how much space you have and how well your cart is working. Then take some time to analyze what you have. Here are a few things to consider and attempt to work out: Does the classroom teacher have individual desks or shared tables? This feels like one of the most important issues as sharing a palette of paint between 5 kids at a table is a whole lot easier than setting out 25 trays for individual desks. If at all possible, set-up tables or desks so that you can group 4-6 kids together for supply sharing. Does...

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