we help adults teach art to kids

Fairytales

Fairy Tale Kings and Queens Art Project

Fairy Tale Kings and Queens Art Project

By on Jan 9, 2012 | 17 comments

Continuing along with my Fairy Tale Royals art unit, fourth grade students used the classic double-loading paintbrush technique and drawing with black paint to create these stunning Fairy Tale Royals. Starting Off To begin, hand each student a piece of 12″ x 18″ white drawing/construction paper. Place small tubs of black liquid tempera paint (mixed with a bit of water) and small tipped brushes on each table. For a table of 5-6 kids, I place two containers of black paint. For ease of prep, I keep this black paint stored in small yoghurt containers with lids in my cupboard, and pull out whenever needed. Drawing with Black Paint I demonstrate how to begin the drawing using black paint. I tell the children that the trick to painting with black paint is to not be fearful of mistakes. If a line is drawn that you don’t like, keep going! Once dry, the black lines are fairly easy to cover with thick tempera paint. So to begin, draw a large letter “U” in the middle of the paper. Next, draw the crown.After the crown comes the neck and shoulders. Finally the hair and face. It’s really important for the kids to keep the drawing simple at this stage. Just the basic outlines and no details. Not even the face if they can help it. Double Loading Painting Technique Use tempera paint that hasn’t been watered down–in other words, straight from the bottle! Use a medium sized brush and dip brush into one paint color. Without swirling or stirring, dip the brush into another color. There should be two colors on the paint brush.Take the double-loaded brush and paint onto paper. Lay down the paint in a single stroke, resisting the urge to blend the colors too much. You can do this of course, but it looks so cool to see both colors on the paper. It’s that simple! To see a demo of the double-loading technique, click here. Painting Order I instruct the kids to paint the face and neck first, then the clothes and hair and finally the background. For the crown I set out a few trays of gold and silver tempera paint. It looks amazing with this project but...

Read More

Watercolor Castle Art Project

Watercolor Castle Art Project

By on Jan 6, 2012 | 24 comments

My Kinder students joined in on the fairy tale fun by learning how to turn lines and shapes into a castle. By combining squares, rectangles, triangle and a few half circles, Kinders created their very own castle. You don’t need many supplies; a 12″ x 18″ piece of regular drawing paper, some liquid watercolors and some oil pastels. I like to start the drawing with a simple line. Children select their favorite color and draw a line across the bottom of the paper, being careful not to touch either side. Then, they draw two long lines up each side. The drawing at this point looks like a square with 3 sides. Now, they complete the two towers by drawing a short line across the top of each tower and then all the way down to the first line. This may sound complicated, but it isn’t. The towers are basically two rectangles. To make the face of the castle, connect the two towers with one simple line. Above the line, children draw battlements. Place two triangles on top of the towers and the drawing is really taking shape. After adding embellishments such as flags, a doorway and windows, children use their colored oil pastels to draw bricks or patterns. The final step is to paint over all the shapes with liquid watercolor.  If you have liquid watercolor, use it here. It really helps having the pre-mix colors as pan watercolors would take slightly longer to apply. I opted to cut out the castles with the students so we could make a bulletin board display, but if you don’t like that idea, continue drawing a simple background (add a horizon line at least) and paint.     Looking for more castle projects? How to Draw a Castle for 4th Grade Fairy Tale Castle Project for Second Grade This post contains affiliate links...

Read More

Fairy Tale Castles Art Project

Fairy Tale Castles Art Project

By on Jan 5, 2012 | 14 comments

This easy, two-part project is perfect for first through third grade students. After a brief discussion about castles and all the wonderful features they have, I demonstrated a basic castle drawing techniques. We used white oil pastel on black paper to draw the castles. Then, using a household sponge cut into 1/2″ x 1 1/2″ pieces, children dipped damp sponges into silver metallic tempera paint and created the stones or bricks. Encourage stamping right off the ends of the paper as the castles will be cut out later on (this solves the problem of fitting full sized bricks into small spaces, although you can also use the ends of the sponges). The sponges created an old-world effect that the children loved. Once dry (usually the end of class one), children cut out their castles and use paper scraps to create windows, doorways, flags and banners. I set out a tray of paper scraps, scissors and glue sticks and gave a few directions on how to cut out an arched window (fold paper in half), flags and banners. The children completed their castles at varying times, so to entertain the children who finished early, I set them to work painting a large sheet of craft paper to act as the backdrop for the castles. They really enjoyed the freedom to create their own signature castle.  Second Grade...

Read More

Princess and the Pea Art Lesson

Princess and the Pea Art Lesson

By on Jan 1, 2012 | 18 comments

Here is a great lesson that uses oil pastels/crayons and watercolor for a classic resist lesson. Very easy to draw, this Princess and The Pea project can be achieved in two, 45-minute class sessions. This project was inspired by a Princess and the Pea art project on the Easely Amused website, a children’s art workshop in Mississippi. They have great lesson ideas, so check it out! You’ll need the following supplies: 12″ x 18″ white construction/sulphite paper Black oil pastels Colored oil pastels or crayons Watercolor paints Brushes (medium) Gold glitter White school glue Here’s what you do: For a final flourish, children dabbed white school glue onto the crown and we sprinkled with a tiny bit of glitter. We all agreed it was the perfect finish to this very fun project! This post contains affiliate links Third Grade Princess and the Pea...

Read More

Fairy Tale Royal Kinder Portraits

Fairy Tale Royal Kinder Portraits

By on Nov 16, 2011 | 16 comments

My Kinder students created adorable kinder portraits with an added twist…crowns! It gave me the opportunity to break out my jars of glitter and allow my smallest students to express themselves through line and color (and a bit of sparkle!) Drawing the Portraits The process is pretty simple and requires few art supplies. Give each student a piece of white regular drawing paper (Sulphite Construction paper) and a pre-cut crown. Note: I used the crown templates from my Art and Literature Art Lesson Plan booklet but you can create your own or have the children draw their own crowns directly onto their paper. I will say this: if you are short on time ( I have 35 minutes for kinder art), consider a template. It provides a great starting point for children. If they all have the same sized-crowns, it makes drawing the face a bit easier. Also, in this particular kinder class, there are a few challenging (yet quite adorable!) children who would be overwhelmed without a starting point. Just something to think about and do what’s best for your students. Anyway…back to the fun stuff… Set a tray of oil pastels and a few crown templates. Trace the crown near the top of the paper. Draw a big letter “U” under the crown. Start at the bottom left corner of the crown, make a big U up to the bottom right side of the crown. This is why I love the templates…everyone now has a good size face! Continue drawing facial features, neck, shoulders and hair. I demonstrate how to draw these things but mostly I allow the children to create their own face. There is something about kinder lines that are so adorable; you just don’t want to tamper with their innocence! Painting and Adding Glitter Set a palette of tempera paints on the tables (I’m using the tempera cakes at the moment and LOVE them) and of course, water and brushes. Paint the whole piece. I try to encourage the children to choose different colors for the hair, crown and background, but well, sometimes a kid really gets into a color choice and they paint everything that one color. Again, it’s Kinder and cute, so...

Read More