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Snowman Collage Project

Snowman Collage Project

By on Jan 10, 2014 | 5 comments

This happy snowman teaches color theory, collage techniques, and perspective in about two, 45-minutes art classes. I did this project with two first grade classes and varied the sequence or steps to see which method is the most effective.  Whenever you have a multi-step project, it helps to figure out the best sequence or you’ll end up creating a lot of confusion. The following instructions outlines what I think is the best approach… This is what you’ll need: 12 x 18″ sheet white paper Puck or cake tempera paint for background (or use liquid tempera) White liquid tempera paint Strips of 6″ x 3″ scraps of paper (craft paper and solids) for scarves 5″ x 5″ paper scraps for hat 6″ x 3″ orange paper for nose Black oil pastel for drawing Containers of white school glue and glue brushes Scissors Brushes and water Snowflake glitter and white glue Q-Tips and white liquid tempera (watered down a bit) Set-up For the first step, which is painting the background, set a sheet of white paper at each child’s place setting. Add a cup of black oil pastels, one tray of puck tempera paint, brushes, water, and white liquid tempera paint. I like to use paper placemats underneath the art work. Use the first ten minutes of class to read a book to the children. My favorite books to read are Snowballs, A Perfect Day and The Biggest Snowman Ever. The children will use the rest of the class painting the background. 1. Draw a backwards letter “C” on one side of the paper (head). To get the starting point correct, have children place hand over paper with pinky touching the top of the paper. Make a dot where thumb reaches. This is the starting point. Then, place oil pastel near the bottom of the shape and draw a curved line extending towards the bottom right corner (belly). Paint background with blue, purple and white, mixing the three paint colors together. 2. I used puck tempera paints for ease of set-up and the fact that puck tempera dries faster. If you don’t have these you can substitute either watercolor paints (its not necessary to use watercolor paper) or liquid tempera paints....

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Mixed-Media Snowman

Mixed-Media Snowman

By on Jan 7, 2013 | 3 comments

If I had to choose my favorite snowman art lesson, it would be this one. The combination of skills: tracing, cutting, shading, drawing, pasting, composition, and painting checks off all of the standards but it was self-expression that really dialed this lesson up.  I love seeing children engaged in art projects. You know the look; head down, tongue sticking out the side of the mouth, paint-covered hands. When this happens, you know the project hit a good note. It helps to begin this lesson with steps and process, but allow the children to finish the embellishments without interference. This is what my first graders did… Using long pieces of white sulphite paper (cut an 18″ x 24″ sheet into 3 panels of 8″ x 18″), children used puck tempera paints to create a background of their choice. We talked about the color of a snowman and determined that it was white, so if the background was white as well, the snowman might disappear. While this concept was appealing to some, most kids painted swirls, stripes, flowers, blobs and messes on their white sheet of paper. Using another piece of 18″ x 8″ white sulphite paper, children drew a curved line that resembled a hill on the bottom part of their paper. This indeed, would become the bottom of their snowman. Placing a medium sized plastic container on top of the hill, the children traced a circle. Using a smaller plastic container (sometimes the opposite ends work well. I used ice cream containers), trace the head of the snowman. Make sure all of the elements do not touch. Cut out each snowman section. We talked about gravity and how a ball sitting on top of another ball would just roll off. So to prevent this from happening to a snowman, the pieces must overlap. Glue these pieces to the background. Using oil pastels, draw facial features and stick arms. Using a light blue chalk pastel, create shadows along one side of the snowman. Now comes the expressive part. Set out trays of painted paper, craft papers (I like to buy the big sets of decorative cardstock at crafts stores), buttons and yarn. Offer the children ideas, like how to fit...

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Winter Snowman Collage Art Lesson

Winter Snowman Collage Art Lesson

By on Dec 17, 2010 | 4 comments

Kindergartners are quite young and some struggle with their fine-motor skills such as holding an oil pastel and cutting with scissors. This snowman art project is a great practice for developing these skills. All kids came away feeling mighty proud of their work. How to draw a snowman without using circles Drawing circles can be a challenge for this age group but I didn’t want to resort to tracing plastic cups like I sometimes do, because this lesson is all about the drawing practice. Instead, I had another technique I wanted to share with my Kinders. I talked about the construction of a snowman; turning a handful of snow turn into a heavy snow ball and topping with a hat. Using a black oil pastel, we drew a letter “u” for the head/face. On top of that, we added a hat. Instead of drawing circles, we focused on drawing curved lines. As I walked around to check on the kids drawings, I realized how hard it was for so many to draw a snowman but it was very easy for them to “build” a clay snowman just a month prior. A testament to the benefits of clay, I’d say! Adding color and glitter After drawing our snowmen on blue or turquoise paper, the children got out their scissors and began cutting around the blacklines. It’s a bit tricky cutting around the stick arms so I suggested they giving a lot of space. If an arm got snipped, I had tape on stand-by mode. After the snowman are cut out, use some watered-down glue or Mod-Podge and brush over surface of the snowman. Shake white or iridescent glitter over surface before glue dries. Painting a snowy Background Give each child a black piece of paper (or blue if you want a daytime look) and a tub of white tempera paint. Here’s a trick: in order to cover the black paper with snow, don’t add any water to the white paint. If it remains nice and thick, the snow will look better. But, if you want to splatter snowflakes like we did,  you’ll need to water down the paint so it can splatter well. Another idea (and probably a good compromise) is...

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Adorable Close-up Snowman Painting

Adorable Close-up Snowman Painting

By on Feb 8, 2009 | 28 comments

It’s hard to resist adding a snowman project into an art curriculum. They’re easy to draw and oh, so cute. I did this lesson with my first graders but it would also be a perfect lesson for second or third. The whole point of this lesson is to have the children think about what a snowman would look like close-up and on an angle. Most want to draw the three circles and get on with it so I try to keep their interest by showing them a different way to draw a snowman. How to draw a 3/4 view snowman With the paper positioned tall rather than wide, use a black oil pastel (or black crayon) to draw a sideways letter “U” about one hand’s width down one the left side of a blue piece of paper. Draw a hat on top of this curved line so that the kids can see that this sideways “U” is really a head. I demonstrate a few different types of hats, so try a few out. To make the body, position the oil pastel along the bottom part of the head and draw another curved line that reaches all the way down to the bottom of the paper. Now we have a snowman and we didn’t draw one circle. Add two dots for eyes, a big carrot nose that extends beyond the line for the face and a big smile. To make the scarf, draw another curved line that matches the head shape. Add a scarf tail. Painting the Snowman Use white tempera paint to paint the snowman. The white is quite thick in the bottle and normally I would add water to thin out the paint to a good brushing consistency, but not here. You want the white paint to be thick enough to cover the blue paper. Once the snowman is painted white, bring out the colored tempera paint and paint the carrot nose, hat and scarf. Wait until the white paint dries before adding the eyes and mouth back in with the oil pastel. Snowflakes  The best way to make perfect snowflakes is to use a Q-tip. Dip in paint and dot all over the paper (including the hat, scarf, etc.) The children loved...

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Collage Snowman Kindergarten Art Lesson

Collage Snowman Kindergarten Art Lesson

By on Jan 22, 2008 | 19 comments

Kinders had a terrific time creating their collage snowman. It’s a very simple lesson to do with this age group. You’ll need two, 30-minute sessions. Art Supplies: 12″ x 18″  white or light blue sulphite paper tissue paper (cool colors) white, black, orange, red, blue liquid tempera paint liquid starch (available in the laundry supply aisle of your supermarket) sequins medium sized all purpose brushes Creating the background Cut small pieces of tissue paper into small pieces (violet, blue, pink and any other cool colors) and arrange on trays. Set tray in the middle of table for each group of kids. Demonstrate how to apply tissue paper to 9 x 11 white or light blue paper using liquid starch and a small brush. Encourage the kids to add tissue paper even to the edges-they can be trimmed later. Painting the snowman Put out a few colors of tempera paint (white, light blue, red, orange, black) and demonstrate how the kids might paint a snowmen. They have their own ideas, so I usually don’t force them to stick with the three-circle theory! You may want to consider placing the white tempera paint in a separate container. The children will use this color first and then, after they are finished with it, you can remove it from the table. Another good tip is not to add any water to the white tempera paint. You want it to be thick enough to cover the tissue paper. Final details Place a small container of  snowflake-shaped sequins on each table. The children can use white school glue to add dots to their artwork and place sequin on white glue...

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Perfect Timing: Solutions for Early Finishers – Art Made Easy 029

Perfect Timing: Solutions for Early Finishers – Art Made Easy 029

By on Oct 12, 2016 | 6 comments

Do you get frustrated when your students rush to finish a project to work on free drawing or a coloring sheet? Do you find you are constantly being challenge to find solutions for early finishers? In this episode of Art Made Easy, I walk you through strategies to help your students finish an art project during the scheduled time plus tips to help you assess your lesson timelines, free choice activities and grade-level projects. IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL LEARN:  Why you really need to step back and look at the reasons why timing is problematic in the first place What to expect when kids begin art projects How providing predictability in what your children can expect in the art room can go a long way in gauging how long it will take them to do a certain task How demonstrations can be used before, and during a lesson, to grow the listening and attention skills of your students Why your reaction matters The benefits of sticking to a lesson that was tested for that grade level Why setting up as many limitations as possible for the “perfectionist” student is the best thing you can do How to use free choice time effectively Why portfolios can be a good alternative to free choice The benefits of directed line drawings and how they can be used to help get a handle on how long children are able to work on a project Patty’s strategies and script for teaching a direct drawing Subscribe to Art Made Easy and receive new episodes directly on your phone via your podcast Ap.  Note: If you have an iPhone, subscribe in iTunes. If you have an Android phone, subscribe in Stitcher. SHOW NOTES Draw & Paint a ¾ View Snowman Art Project How to Draw a Snowman without using Circles Art Project AME 025: All About Guided Drawings All About Free-Choice Art...

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