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Famous Artists

Romero Britto-Inspired Hearts

Romero Britto-Inspired Hearts

By on Jan 22, 2016 | 16 comments

Romero Britto is a Brazilian born artist who now lives in Miami, Florida. His modern pop culture art work is known and celebrated all over the world. Like many art teachers, I love his work and love introducing his colorful art to my students. THE PROJECT Using broad tip markers like these markers from Faber-Castell and a piece of card stock, you can create an easy-to-draw Valentine’s Day Pop-Art Hearts with your kids. Here are the basic steps: Draw curved lines on bottom of paper with black marker Draw “sun” and sun’s rays (straight lines) Draw a large heart over and in-between the rays Double up the black lines so they are thick Use broad tip markers to color in areas of the artwork Light colors make a good color choice for large areas Draw patterns over white paper or colored areas THE VIDEO   Download a Free drawing Guide RESOURCES If you enjoyed the short video, you can extend your unit on Pop Art by studying Pop Art painter, Romero Britto. Artists bio and mixed-media lesson plan and video below: Romero Britto Pop Art Mixed Media PDF Lesson plan & Video Faber-Castell Children’s Art Products...

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Van Gogh Artist Bundle

Van Gogh Artist Bundle

By on Oct 20, 2015 | 2 comments

Van Gogh is one of the Greatest Art Masters of all time. His art is iconic and recognized by most. He created some of the most beautiful landscape paintings and still life works of art, including Starry Night and his Sunflower series. I love teaching children about Van Gogh but when I first began teaching, I had a hard time finding lessons that young children could be successful at. It took me 6 years to finally find the right painting technique to teach children. I detailed my approach in my Starry Night Lesson Plan. This Van Gogh Bundle is designed to give you easy-to-teach art projects that explore Van Gogh’s most famous and recognized pieces of art: Starry Night Sunflowers Irises Wheat Fields and Cypresses   Planning an art curriculum around an artist involves research and planning time. This bundle does the work for you by providing all you need to teach your kids about Van Gogh and the Post-Impressionist period. The bundle includes: Artist poster to print out and use in your introduction Art video & lesson plan of the Sunflower Fields that will offer a video biography of Van Gogh plus a step-by-step video of the creation process to play in your class or for your kids at home. 8 lessons that introduce Van Gogh and teach his concepts and/or paintings using fun art techniques. Artist Worksheet (Click banner below to download your free worksheet!) Van Gogh coloring pages to use as drawing guides or for subs or free-choice art time 2 Videos are available as downloads in zip files. 1 video available via access to Art School for Kids The Lessons: Van Gogh Irises & Video Lesson (grades 3-6) Van Gogh Sunflowers-3 Projects + video (grades 1-6) Van Gogh Landscape (Wheatfields and Cypresses) 2 Projects (Grades 3-6) Coloring pages/Drawing Guides (all ages) Starry Night Lesson (grades 3-6) Sunflower Fields Collage Lesson Plan + video (Grades 4-7) Van Gogh Poster This worksheet prompts students to view and reflect upon three of Van Gogh’s most famous works of art: Starry Night, Sunflowers and Irises. Chances are you have all the art supplies you need to complete all the lessons in this bundle. Sunflowers Projects: white drawing paper, liquid tempera paint, oil pastels or crayons, acrylic paint, canvas sheets, pencils. Sunflower Fields: Sulphite paper (white & colored),...

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Picasso Artist Bundle

Picasso Artist Bundle

By on Aug 24, 2015 | 3 comments

Pablo Picasso is one of the great masters. His art is displayed in museums all over the world. He invented an art movement and in doing so crowned himself The King of Cubism. No doubt you’ve purchased a Picasso calendar or print at least once in your lifetime. And because of his influence and popularity, he is probably on your school curriculum list. I love Picasso’s work and he is one of my favorite artists to talk about with my art students. Artists create art movements through their creativity. It’s not always easy to think differently and then act on it, but that’s exactly what Picasso did. He stayed true to his work and his viewpoint. The Picasso Art bundle is designed to give you easy-to-teach art projects that explore Picasso’s most famous and recognized works of art: Three Musicians Portrait of Dora Maar Portrait of Sylvette David Rose and Blue Period Artwork Planning an art curriculum around an artist involves research and planning time. This bundle does the work for you by providing all you need to teach your kids about Cubism and Picasso. Artist poster to print out and use in your introduction Art video of the Three Musicians that will offer a video biography of Picasso plus a step-by-step video of the creation process to play in your class or for your kids at home. 6 lessons (3 lower grade and 3 upper) that introduce Picasso and teach his concepts and/or paintings using fun art techniques. Artist Worksheet (Click BLUE BANNER to download your free worksheet!) Picasso coloring pages for subs or free-choice art time Don’t have an art department? Chances are you have all the art supplies you need to complete all the lessons in this bundle. Cubist Bird Paintings: white drawing paper, liquid tempera paint, oil pastels or crayons, colored construction/sulphite paper Rose & Blue Period Hearts: Sulphite paper (white & colored), liquid tempera paint, oil pastels, pencils, white school glue Portrait of Dora Maar: Oil pastels or crayons, liquid tempera paint, white sulphite paper Le Coq Drawings: Oil pastel, chalk pastels, black sulfite paper Easy Cubism: White card stock, colored markers, Sharpie marker Three Musicians: Colored & white sulphite paper, liquid tempera paint, scissors, glue sticks, yarn, markers Purchase this...

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Happy Birthday Alexander Calder!

Happy Birthday Alexander Calder!

By on Jul 22, 2015 | 0 comments

  Happy Birthday, Alexander Calder! I share a birthday month with some of my favorite artists: Frida Khalo July 6th, Marc Chagall July 7th, Amedeo Modigliani July 12th, Gustav Klimt July 14th, Edgar Degas July 19th and Alexander Calder July 22nd. It’s a great month, don’t you think? Alexander Calder’s life was spent tinkering, creating and basically living his life the way we hope our children will. He adored toys and was fascinated by the moving parts. This obsession lead him to create one of his most famous pieces, Calder’s Circus.   I think one of the best books on Calder is the picture book, Sandy’s Circus. It’s a great read and the illustrations are amazing; perfect for the art room.   Another great book, especially when you are teaching art at home, is Meet the Artist Series book on Alexander Calder. Its an interactive study of Calder, with art projects built into the book. It’s not the greatest book to read in the art room as it focuses more on facts an not a story. Still, I love it and use it in the classroom. Take a look inside the book here: Meet the Artist: Alexander Calder I don’t know what it is about me. Once I discover the potential of a particular’s artist impact in the classroom, I can’t stop creating lessons based on the artist. Last year, my second grade class began the school year with a simple and technique-riche art project. They combined cutting shapes organically (translation: without drawing!), drawing shapes and lines and then painting with colors used by Calder in his works. The full lesson plan comes with artist information, coloring pages/drawing guides, kids galleries and step-by-step tutorial. You can take a look at it here: Alexander Calder Lesson Plan To accompany this lesson, I create a Calder artist reference poster. I’m loving these posters because it saves so much prep time sorting through my stacks of art images and posters. It combines all the images I love and use in my art project. Take a look at the poster here: Alexander Calder Artist Poster   The ABSOLUTE BEST THING I purchased for my art room this year are these: Oh my goodness. They are an amazing...

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Picasso’s Le Coq Pastel Project

Picasso’s Le Coq Pastel Project

By on May 21, 2015 | 3 comments

The inventory situation in my art room has reached a critical point. I have depleted my black oil pastels, white paper and white paint. This trio is my milk, eggs and bread of the art room.  Not wanting to place an order when I have two more weeks of classes, I’m forced to go beyond what is comfortable and start using up the left-overs. My pastel drawer, which in September was flush, organized and plentiful, is now barren, chipped, stubby and pathetic. Still, chalk pastels work just as well when they are broken and as when they are unbroken. My fifth graders hadn’t worked with chalk this year so I brought out my trays of broken bits and thought back to one of my more successful chalk lessons for older kids, Big Fat Hens. Turns out that I have a huge carton of black paper (the results of a paper ordering mistake) so I set black paper, oil pastels and chalk pastels on the table. Instead of re-creating the Big Fat Hens lesson, I recalled that Picasso created a colorful cubist rooster. Turns out that I had a poster of this piece, so I introduced Pablo Picasso’s Le Coq to my fifth graders.   To start, I had some fun on the white board demonstrating how Picasso used cubism to draw portraits. I drew examples of how the profile and frontal views of a face merged to form a typical “Picasso” portrait and how he used the same technique with the rooster. We talked about the placement of the rooster’s eyes and how Picasso broke up the body into angular sections. Then the kids got busy. First they used a colored oil pastel to draw the rooster. My fifth graders are very comfortable drawing with oil pastel at this point in their art journey. They know that if a mistake is made, they can turn it into something else or turn over the paper. Some of the kids practiced on one side of the paper and created their good drawings on the other side. Read how to work with chalk pastels here. Using my collection of broken chalk pieces, I demonstrated how to color in a shape with one color, add another color for interest and then smudge the...

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The Great Wave Art Lesson Plan & Video

The Great Wave Art Lesson Plan & Video

By on Apr 12, 2015 | 8 comments

Inspired by the book The Great Wave: A Children’s Book Inspired by Hokusai by Véronique Massenot and Bruno Pilorget and the painting The Great Wave off Kanazawa by Katsushika Hokusai, my fourth grade kids created the most beautiful paintings. I was hesitant to create an art lesson inspired by Hokusai’s The Great Wave. As a girl who loves Matisse and Van Gogh, Hokusai’s colors are rather bland and subdued. It wasn’t until I picked up Massenot’s picture book that lead me down a rabbit hole of Japanese art and wood cuttings. In the end, I wanted this project to inject color theory and personality. My goal was to introduce a piece of art that told a story. In fact, as stated in Massenot’s book, Hokusai was inside by French composer, Claude Debussy. He happens to be my favorite composer so as I was creating this lesson, I listen to DeBussy. The music and the art was a bit of a mis-match to me as DeBussy’s music is so ethereal and The Great Wave is so powerful. I wish I added this musical element into my art lessons as it would have been interesting to see what the kids thought. Onto the art project… What You’ll Need: 12″ x 18″ white drawing paper Black oil pastel, pencils or your choice of mediums. I don’t use pencils for this reason. Cake tempera paints White liquid tempera paint (watered down just a bit) Brush & water  Drawing the Great Wave This drawing is broken up into three sections: Foreground (first two waves) Middle Ground (main wave) Background (horizon line and Mt. Fuji) We started by looking at a poster of Hokusai’s Great Wave and broke down the painting into the three sections. We drew the first wave first, then added the second wave and finally added the main wave. Drawing the waves was very easy and intuitive for almost every single child. If you eliminate the fuss of all the whitecaps, the kids can see how the shape of the wave is very simple. The biggest wave should extend almost to the top of the paper. Once the main lines of the waves are drawn, the children drew the whitecaps. This is easier than it looks. We practiced...

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