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Video Art Tips & Lessons

How I teach Directed Line Drawings

How I teach Directed Line Drawings

By on Mar 13, 2017 | 3 comments

You either love ’em art hate ’em. Directed drawings can be the antithesis of your art philosophy or your biggest joy. I happen to fall a bit in between. I used directed line drawings (or guided drawings) with my younger set to get them accustomed to art room procedures, pacing and listening skills. And while achieving these things is great for the teacher, directed drawings also provide an enormous benefits to children. This video, podcast (below) and PDF download will help you identify when directed drawings are beneficial and when they need to be replaced with observational drawings. Listen to Art Made Easy 025: All About Guided Drawings To download the PDF, click the YELLOW box, add your name and email and you will automatically receive the download. Check your...

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Join me for a Free Training!

Join me for a Free Training!

By on Dec 31, 2016 | 6 comments

Imagine this… Open House, May 2016. A year’s worth of teaching, planning, and creating paid off. My room looked exactly how I wanted it to, and it was decorated from floor to ceiling with DSS art projects. Parents were literally in awe of what their 8 year-old children had created. The kids were beaming with pride, the parents were teary with gratitude, and I felt like a rock star! Amazing, right? We all want to feel this! This was posted in Facebook from from Michelle, a member in Deep Space Sparkle’s The Members’ Club. She went from not knowing a thing about art to creating art on a regular basis with her 2nd grade students. I couldn’t be happier for her and I want it for you, too. Start the new year with art projects that are guaranteed to engaged and inspire students. It’s a bold statement but I know that if you apply even three out of the five steps, you’ll experience an uptick in student behavior, less frustrated artists and projects that surprise kids with their artistic ability. RESERVE YOUR SEAT Here are the details: The 60-minute TRAINING focuses on: 5 Steps on how to identify the best projects for each grade level (K-6) What art supplies work best with each age group What skills are essential to learn in each grade plus much more. There’s a lot to cover, so I created a TRAINING WORKBOOK for you to download and fill out as we move through the training. You’ll receive an email with a link to download the workbook after you register.   A FEW MORE BONUSES… https://d3ndagut9sanks.cloudfront.net/Launch-D/TMC+L3+Webinar+LP.mp4 I’m a visual learner so I think it’s important to have something to download and keep. I created TWO art resources that will help you plan your art program. The first is a curriculum guide and skills checklist. It’s a super handy list of skills that you can expect children to be proficient at in each grade level. This helps when you are looking at a lesson and are trying to determine whether it will work for your group of kids. The second is a list of art supplies, where to buy them and most importantly, how to use them. I don’t make any...

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Watercolor Paints & Paper: What Works Best

Watercolor Paints & Paper: What Works Best

By on Dec 11, 2016 | 3 comments

Here’s a question I get asked a lot: Can I use regular paper with my watercolor paints? Or do I need to use watercolor paper? The answer is yes! I like using liquid watercolor paints (affiliate link) on regular sulphite drawing paper but it only works well for a specific result. Here’s a video to explain what the differences are: https://d11vly3u9uru85.cloudfront.net/2016-D/watercolor+paper+and+paints.mp4 Summary Sulphite paper is about 76 lbs and will soak up the watercolor paint quickly. This doesn’t make it an effective surface to promote color blending or using the salting technique. Watercolor is best for blending watercolors and adding salt for that lovely starburst effect because it has texture. This allows the watercolor paint to sit on the paper surface for a longer period of time to allow for the mingling. The biggest difference is using glitter watercolor paints on sulphite paper. The viscosity in the glitter watercolor seems to help the liquid stay on the paper’s surface long enough for an effective salting technique. Here are some projects that use liquid watercolor paints on regular sulphite paper: 1. Watercolor Castle for Kinders-Second Grade 2. Watercolor Sunflowers 3. Underwater Hippos for second and third grade Interested in experimenting with more watercolor techniques? DOWNLOAD THE WATERCOLOR TECHNIQUE CHEAT SHEET Just click on the image below, add your name and email and you will be sent the PDF via your email address (make sure to check you spam/junk mail folder). Note: You will also be directed to a Thank you page where you can see other freebies that may interest...

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Gustav Klimt: Master of Metallics

Gustav Klimt: Master of Metallics

By on Dec 5, 2016 | 4 comments

Introducing Gustav Klimt to your students is really like opening up a pot of gold. There are so many interesting facets to his art and his life. One of the most impactful pieces to his story is how many of his works were destroyed by the Germans during WWII. Medicine, painted in 1900-1907 was destroyed along with a few others. I recently picked up a book that features beautiful Klimt-inspired illustrations. If you are doing a lesson on Klimt and in particular, his Tree of Life, I encourage you to find a copy of this book. Perfect for grade 3 and...

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Tempera vs Acrylic Paint

Tempera vs Acrylic Paint

By on Sep 1, 2016 | 3 comments

I avoided acrylic paint for a long time. I was happy with my liquid tempera and watercolor paints and didn’t see the allure of acrylics. Now, for my own art, nothing beats acrylics. But who wants to mess around with tubes with 30 kids? This was my mindset for a long time. When I learned about acrylic paints that were meant for an elementary classroom, I was excited to give them a try. I order some Blick acrylic paints and experimented with a few projects. Everything that was said about acrylic paints was true…they were smooth, beautiful and had a lovely finish. Then I made the BIG mistakes that only experienced art teachers know not to do: I cleaned my plastic muffin-palette filled with acrylic paints in the sink. Two days later, my sink was clogged. Here’s the thing. Acrylic paints dry to a hard plastic. And when your pour them down your drain, they will stick to your pipes. And if you don’t clean your brushes well, then the same hard plastic will adhere to the bristles. So that had me swearing off acrylics for  along time. Cut to this summer…. I was creating art with my 3-year old niece in Canada. I needed supplies so I went to the closest store. They carried a few craft acrylics but not much else. So I bought a smock, grabbed some primary colors and prepared to cover my niece so she wouldn’t ruin her clothes. Turns out that the acrylic I bought was very (very!) similar to regular liquid tempera paint. It even washed away like tempera. It didn’t even dry to a hard plastic finish. I was amazed. And surprised. Here’s a video that shows how craft acrylic paints are just like liquid tempera paints. Maybe they will work for you! Save time and effort with a done-for-you artist curriculum, art training, art lesson downloads and a supportive, engaged community within The Members’ Club. Don’t miss the next...

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Foil Turtle and Fish Collage

Foil Turtle and Fish Collage

By on Apr 8, 2016 | 27 comments

This lesson was inspired by a lesson in The Usborne Book of Art Projects. It was a huge hit with my third grade class. The lesson in the book focused on fish but I thought a sea turtle would look lovely swimming in the glittery waters. Here’s How: Creating the Background There are a couple of ways to make the water background for the sea turtle and fish. One method is to use liquid or tray watercolors and table salt to make a traditional speckled background as shown above or you could use Mod-Podge and glitter liquid watercolor paints. To make a watercolor and salt background,  use 6″ x 9″ pieces of 90 lb watercolor paper and regular watercolor paints.  Wet the paper with a sponge or large brush, then mix blue and green watercolors onto the wet watercolor paper (wet-on-wet technique). Salting the surface will give the “ocean” a sparkly quality. I had some of the Mod-Podge glittery paints left over from the Fancy Fish Lesson, so I though I may as well use it up before it hardened and became unusable. The students brushed the leftover “glittery paint” onto a piece of blue or lavender drawing paper. The results were shimmery and ocean perfect. To make the glitter paint, combine a few table spoons of glitter liquid watercolors with about a ¼ cup of gloss Mod-Podge. Stir and use like regular paint. Drawing the Sea Turtle and Fish CLICK TO DOWNLOAD How to Draw a Sea Turtle Set the ocean paper aside and demonstrate how to draw some fish and sea turtles.  The idea is to keep the drawing very simple because the drawing will be created on tin foil. It may be helpful to do a practice drawing on a piece of paper cut to the same size of the tin foil. Use the drawing guide or show pictures of sea turtles and fish and allow the children to identify the basic shapes and colors from photographs. Coloring and Texture You’ll need some heavy weight tin foil (regular tin foil is fine), and some texture boards.  To make a texture board, cut heavy board (tag board, etc) into 9″ x 6″ rectangles.  Cut up old mesh vegetable bags and tape to cardboard. I made about 25 and had a...

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